Boy Dies After School Beating | NBC 10 Philadelphia

Bailey O'Neill's family says he was bullied and beaten

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Caretaker Faces Charges in Death of Philly Toddler
Caretaker Faces Charges in Death of Philly Toddler

A woman remained behind bars a week after a 2-year-old boy she cared for was found dead in a Philadelphia home.

Police Respond to Barricade After Gunman Shoots Teen
Police Respond to Barricade After Gunman Shoots Teen

Police are at the scene of a barricade situation in North Philadelphia.

Indicted Philly District Attorney Needs New Lawyer
Indicted Philly District Attorney Needs New Lawyer

Philadelphia's top prosecutor has three days to find a new lawyer in a federal bribery case against him although it's unclear whether he has the money to pay anyone.

1st Responders, Civilians, Mayor Rescue Families During Fire
1st Responders, Civilians, Mayor Rescue Families During Fire

Police officers, Good Samaritans, firefighters and a Jersey Shore mayor worked together to rescue seven people, including two children who they literally caught in their hands, during a fire at the Jersey Shore.

DNC Asks All Staffers For Resignation Letters: Sources
DNC Asks All Staffers For Resignation Letters: Sources

Democratic National Committee has requested the resignation letters of all current staffers be submitted by next month, according to multiple sources familiar with the party's internal working, NBC News reported. Party staffs typically sees major turnover with a new boss, but the mass resignation letters will give new chairman Tom Perez a chance to completely remake the DNC's headquarters from scratch after staffing had already reached unusual low following a round of layoffs in December. Immediately after Perez' election in late February, an adviser to outgoing DNC Interim Chair Donna Brazile, Leah Daughtry, asked every employee to submit a letter of resignation dated April 15, several sources tell NBC News.

House Votes in Favor of Letting ISPs Sell Your Data
House Votes in Favor of Letting ISPs Sell Your Data

The House of Representatives approved a measure on Tuesday that would keep the Federal Communications Commission from enforcing rules passed last year that would ban internet, cable and mobile providers from selling your data without your consent. With strong opposition from Democrats, the measure narrowly passed in the House by a 215-205 vote. No Democrats voted for the bill, and 15 Republicans opposed it. A similar version squeaked through the Senate last Thursday on a party-line vote of 50-48. The White House said in a statement on Tuesday that Trump "strongly supports" the repeal, while internet privacy advocates frame this as a battle between privacy and profits. Kate Tummarello, a policy analyst at the San Francisco based Electronic Frontier Foundation, said the "commonsense rules" Congress voted to repeal were designed "to protect your data" and keep internet service providers from doing a "host of creepy things" without your consent.