Police Release Stallworth 9-1-1 Calls, But Still No Charges - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Police Release Stallworth 9-1-1 Calls, But Still No Charges

Pedestrian hit by NFL star was out of crosswalk

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    Despite previous reports, Donte Stallworth's blood-alcohol level during the morning of his car accident has not been released.

    Miami Beach police released three emergency calls regarding the fatal accident involving Donte Stallworth near South Beach, but the cops are still mum on if they will charge the NFL receiver.

    The calls were from three different people, none of whom witnessed the accident on March 14, but each got up close with the lifeless body sprawled across the MacArthur Causeway.

    "He's dead. He's dead," exclaimed one woman, whose voice trembled as she tried to explain to police the location of the incident.

    Another man was on his way to work when he heard the thud from the impact of 59-year-old Mario Reyes' body with the front of Stallworth's car. By the time he raced to the sidewalk, Reyes was already limp on the pavement.

    A fourth call was not released by police but it is believed to be Stallworth's 9-1-1 call.

    All three callers said they did not see the Bentley at the scene of the accident but police have confirmed Stallworth did not drive away from the scene. A police report stated Stallworth flashed his high beam lights several times in an effort to warn Reyes about crossing the street.

    Reyes, who was trying to cross the street to catch the bus, did not appear to be in the cross walk, police said.

    But questions remain on whether Stallworth was drunk at the time of the incident and if he will be charged with a crime. Several media outlets have reported Stallworth was well over the .08 legal blood-alcohol limit, but police have not released toxicology reports.

    Stallworth's attorney claims the media reports are false and that his client has not heard from police about the results of the tests. If the receiver was drunk, he could face vehicular manslaughter charges.