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Pennsylvania

All Nonessential Businesses Across Pennsylvania Closing

The governor's declaration Monday follows similar lockdowns already in place or announced in Philadelphia and its suburbs

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Pennsylvania is extending its shutdown of nonessential businesses and other activities to the entire state as it continues to wrestle with the coronavirus pandemic.

That means the limitations that are already affecting Philadelphia and its suburbs are in affect in all of Pennsylvania. Previously Monday, New Jersey also closed nonessential businesses.

Nonessential stores must close, and bars and restaurants must restrict their business to takeout.

Gov. Wolf announced over the weekend that all Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores and licensee service centers in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery counties would be closed after Monday.

All remaining Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores and licensee service centers across Pennsylvania will be closed on Tuesday at 9 p.m. and will remain closed until further notice.

Adult day cares and similar programs that take place during the day must also close.

Grocery stores and other necessary stores can stay open.

PennDOT also announced they would close all Driver License Centers and Photo License Centers in Pennsylvania for two weeks starting on Monday. Expiration dates for driver licenses, ID cards, vehicle registrations and safety and emission inspections will be extended.

All PennDOT District and County maintenance offices are closed while all rest areas and welcome centers statewide will be closed to the public starting at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday.

Cash and credit cards also will not be accepted anywhere on the PA Turnpike’s ticket system. All tolls will be assessed electronically via E-ZPass or the PA Turnpike TOLL BY PLATE program as vehicles travel at posted speed limits through tolling points.

The state now has 76 diagnosed cases of the coronavirus, health leaders said Monday.

"This isn't a decision that I take lightly at all," Gov. Tom Wolf said Monday. "It is one I am making because medical experts believe it is the only way we can prevent our hospitals from being overrun by patients."

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