Gene London

Iconic Philly Children’s Show Host Gene London Dies at 88

Gene London, the iconic host of the popular Philadelphia children’s program “Cartoon Corners,” passed away on Sunday, his family announced. He was 88-years-old

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What to Know

  • Gene London, the iconic host of the popular Philadelphia children’s program “Cartoon Corners,” passed away on Sunday, his family announced. He was 88-years-old.
  • London, born Eugene Yulish, was the host of the Philadelphia children’s show “Cartoon Corners” a.k.a. “The Gene London Show” on WCAU-TV (currently NBC10).
  • London's gentle, soft-spoken demeanor endeared him to children and made him an icon for local baby boomers.

Gene London, the iconic host of the popular Philadelphia children’s program “Cartoon Corners,” passed away on Sunday, his family announced. He was 88-years-old.

Born Eugene Yulish in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1931, London initially aspired to be an artist for Disney. He worked as a counselor at Summerdale Day Camp outside of Philadelphia where he taught puppetry as well as arts and crafts.

His television career began in New York City where he played “Johnny Jupiter” on the ABC series “Reject the Robot” in the 1950s. His early career highlights also include stints on the NBC shows “Kartoon Klub,” “Facts ‘n’ Fun” and “Hi, Mom.” He was also the host and a performer on the ABC show “Tinker’s Workshop” in the late 1950s.

London began appearing semi-regularly on NBC’s “The Today Show” with host Dave Garroway in 1959.

London’s biggest career move occurred that same year when he began hosting the Philadelphia children’s show “Cartoon Corners” a.k.a. “The Gene London Show” on WCAU-TV (now NBC10). His gentle, soft-spoken demeanor endeared him to children and made him an icon for local baby boomers.

After “Cartoon Corners” was canceled in 1977, London moved to New York City where he became a dress designer, running the retro clothing shop “Gene London: The Fan Club.”

He also became one of the world’s leading experts and collectors of clothing and costumes of Hollywood’s most iconic movie stars. His expertise allowed him to host the “Golden Age Costumes from the Gene London Cinema Collection” exhibit at the Allentown Art Museum.

In 2009, London was inducted into the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia’s Hall of Fame.

Information on funeral services can be found here.

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