2,400 Bags of Heroin Found in Home With Couple, Girl

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK

    The Monmouth County Narcotics Task Force recovered a large amount of drugs and cash during a recent series of raids, including the recovery of 2,400 bags of heroin found among two parents while in the presence of their 10-year-old child.

    With the help of several local police departments, Monmouth County officials conducted three separate drug raids in March, resulting in 16 arrests.

    On March 7, the Monmouth County Narcotics Strike Force and members of the Neptune City and Tinton Falls police departments performed a search warrant in the Brighton Arms apartment complex in Neptune City, N.J.

    The team seized 48 bricks of heroin -- approximately 2,400 bags -- $5,000 in cash, and a 2010 Acura, all believed to be profits from the sale of drugs.

    A 10-year-old girl was found in the apartment during the raid.

    Her parents, who authorities have identified as Carl Edward Laine and Geneeja Walker were both charged with possession of heroin with intent to distribute and endangering the welfare of a child.

    The parents were later released after posting a total of $125,000 in bail between them.

    The Strike Force also retrieved an additional 200 bags of heroin and less than a half ounce of cocaine during subsequent raids at other locations.

    Acting Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni announced the busts on Monday afternoon. Gramiccioni said the raids are just one part of the county’s efforts to eliminate the sale of heroin and other drugs.

    “When it comes to drug interdiction in Monmouth County heroin is our number one priority. Heroin is killing our young people in record numbers and it is the cause of a lot of crime here and across the country,” he said in a press release.

    Gramiccioni said his department will also be hosting a series of presentations entitled Heroin Kills! Are You Talking To Your Kids Yet? to encourage parents to get involved with drug use prevention.

    “Don’t be fooled. We are not going to arrest our way out of this problem. The scourge of heroin will only be eradicated through education and with vigilance at home,” he said.

    “Couple that message with law enforcement efforts and we can make headway, but the nature of heroin addiction means this problem can only be solved with everyone pulling in the same direction.”