Orionid Meteor Shower Light Up the Night Sky - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Orionid Meteor Shower Light Up the Night Sky

The meteors should've be visible to the naked eye, too, though light pollution may make them harder to see

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    NASA, File
    This October 13, 2015, file photo shows an Orionid meteor recorded by the NASA All Sky Fireball Network station on top of Mt. Lemmon, Arizona.

    A cosmic fireworks show lit up the sky Friday night as the Earth passed through a field of meteoroids.

    The Orionid meteor shower was caused by Earth's orbit through a debris field left by Halley's Comet, and it peaked Friday and into Saturday.

    Friday was a moonless night, too, according to NASA, meaning that — barring cloud cover — up to 10 to 15 meteors per hour were visible before dawn.

    The meteors should've be visible to the naked eye, too, though light pollution may make them harder to see.

    Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks

    [NATL-LA] Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks
    The Orionid meteor shower will peak tonight and tomorrow morning for a magnificent show in the sky. Michael Brownlee reports for the NBC4 News at 5 on Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016.
    (Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016)

    People in the Northeast were treated to an appetizer Wednesday when a fireball flew across the sky Wednesday, visible from Delaware and Pennsylvania to New Hampshire, according to the American Meteor Society. The bright flash of light, caused by a meteor, was sighted by about 200 people.

    The American Meteor Society gives the peak of Orionid activity as Sunday — noting that it's hard to predict meteor activity precisely.