Detours for Philly Drivers as Construction Work Begins on America's Oldest Bridge - NBC 10 Philadelphia
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Detours for Philly Drivers as Construction Work Begins on America's Oldest Bridge

From Monday through the end of August, workers will rehabilitate the stone arch U.S. 13 (Frankford Avenue) Bridge over Pennypack Creek by removing and rebuilding the wall.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    In Need of Repair: Historic Bridge to Close for Months

    Starting Monday, the historic bridge on Frankford Avenue that crosses over the Pennypack Creek will be closed for repairs until August. 

    (Published Monday, March 26, 2018)

    Repair work is set to begin on America’s oldest bridge still in use which will lead to detours for drivers in the Philadelphia area over the next few months.

    From Monday through the end of August, workers will rehabilitate the stone arch U.S. 13 (Frankford Avenue) Bridge over Pennypack Creek by removing and rebuilding the wall. The project will also include installing new protection measures where needed.

    The bridge will be closed and detoured between Solly Avenue and Ashburner Street. During the five-month closure, motorists on Frankford Avenue will be detoured over Rhawn Street, Torresdale Avenue and Linden Avenue. The detour routes will be posted for pedestrians at Pennypack Creek.

    Frankford Avenue Bridge to Close for Next 5 MonthsFrankford Avenue Bridge to Close for Next 5 Months

    Traffic troubles will begin for drivers in Philadelphia Monday. The Frankford Avenue Bridge, the oldest bridge in use in the United States, will close for the next five months for construction.

    (Published Sunday, March 25, 2018)

    The Frankford Avenue Bridge, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1697 and reconstructed in 1893. It’s a three-span stone masonry and concrete closed spandrel arch structure. The bridge is 73-feet long, 50-feet wide and carries about 14,745 vehicles a day, including SEPTA’s Route 66 trolley.