Winners and Losers of the 2019 NBA Draft

Welcome to the NBA, Zion Williamson. 

There weren't too many fireworks on Thursday night in Brooklyn, but plenty of sparklers. By my count, only 10 of the final 41 picks weren't traded. The biggest deal -- the Atlanta Hawks slid up to the Los Angeles Lakers' No. 4 pick that was traded to New Orleans in the Anthony Davis package.

No All-Stars were traded on Thursday night, but there will be plenty of action come June 30. Here are the winners and losers from the 2019 NBA Draft.

Philadelphia 76ers

Complete coverage of the Philadelphia 76ers and their rivals in the NBA from NBC Sports Philadelphia.

‘PHILLY I LOVE YOU': Embiid Pens Touching Apology to Sixers Fans After Loss

‘There's a Lot to Regret': Sixers' Joel Embiid Digests Another Playoff Letdown

Winners

New Orleans Pelicans

Holy smokes did Pelicans executive vice president of basketball operations David Griffin net a ton of value for dropping back to No. 8. In most years, trading out of the top five of the draft would be an incredibly risky move since draft value tends to fall off a cliff at the No. 6 pick. But this isn't most years; we've been hearing for months that the 2019 draft projected to be unusually shallow after Williamson, RJ Barrett and Ja Morant. Griffin obviously felt that he could slide back four slots from No. 4 and still get the player he wanted, center Jaxson Hayes.

Using ESPN's Kevin Pelton nifty draft pick point system to help put transactions like these in perspective, the Pelicans received 3,560 points in draft pick value (1,970 for No. 8; 1,220 for No. 17; 370 for No. 35) compared to 2,450 points going to Atlanta (2,440 for No. 4; 10 for No. 57). That's a humongous gap in value. On top of that, the Pelicans shed Solomon Hill's $13 million contract. On top of that, the Pelicans received Cleveland's 2020 first-round pick, which will likely turn into a pair of second-rounders.

This was a heist by Griffin, who continues to run a clinic in his opening salvo. I'm not in love with the Hayes selection at No. 8. He's a big pick-and-roll dunker in the Tyson Chandler mold, which is a great fit on most rosters. But the Pelicans need shooters around Williamson to amplify his athleticism and Hayes hasn't shown any range outside the paint.

The good news is that Hayes has a really good stroke at the free throw line (74 percent last season at Texas), so he can maybe stretch out and develop a jumper. With that said, Lonzo Ball may shatter the lob record with Williamson and Hayes running at the rim. Sheesh.

By making the trade with Atlanta, the Pelicans have carved out about $30 million in cap space, which they can use to buy more picks down the line or bring in some shooting talent to free up more room for the kids. Don't be surprised if Griffin brings in Jared Dudley, who spent four and a half seasons with Griffin in Phoenix, to help coach up the locker room and bring in a 3-and-D presence on the wing. 

Oh, and by the way, they drafted the best prospect since LeBron James.

Tissue Companies

The decision to add parents to the podium made living rooms and bars instantly become filled with dust. This is the most emotional night in the NBA calendar and it's special for the fans at home to see players as human beings rather than draft picks. 

Philadelphia 76ers

The Sixers needed a 3-and-D rotation player and they just snagged the best defensive wing in the draft with the No. 20 pick in Matisse Thybulle. It's amazing how undervalued defense is on draft night. Thybulle broke the defensive scale last season at Washington averaging 3.5 steals and 2.3 blocks per game as the free safety in Washington's zone defense. If there's any center in the NBA who can own the rim enough to let others roam, it's Joel Embiid.

He can be their Robert Covington. Thybulle has shot 36 percent on over 500 3-pointers in his collegiate career. He shot just 31 percent from downtown last season, but he's better than what he showed there. At 22 years old, he can step in right away and contribute to an already elite defensive core with Ben Simmons and Embiid. 

Sixers fans might get nauseous at the idea of trading up with Boston to pick a Washington product, but this it the back end of the draft, not the front. Also, Thybulle's presence allowed Philly to dump Jonathon Simmons' contract on the Washington Wizards and save an extra $1 million for their free agency pursuits.

Atlanta Hawks

League Pass All-Stars. Adding De'Andre Hunter (No. 4 pick from New Orleans via Los Angeles via crazy lottery luck) and Cam Reddish (No. 10 via Dallas for Luka Doncic), the Hawks figure to be an exciting young squad that will be fascinating to watch next season.

With Trae Young and John Collins' defensive limitations, I love that they targeted Hunter with the No. 4 pick. He may not have the box score stats of a defensive stalwart, but Hunter played in a Virginia defense that suppresses blocks and steals. The Hawks weren't going to let another Malcolm Brogdon slip from their fingers with two of the best offensive young players in the NBA in Young and Collins. Reddish is a question mark, but at No. 10, that's a worthy spot for his upside.

Knicks fans

It's been a rough few weeks for the Knicks faithful. They lost the draft lottery. Their presumed top free agency target, Kevin Durant, tore his Achilles tendon. The Pelicans traded Anthony Davis elsewhere. Just when you thought the Knicks' offseason couldn't get any worse … wait, good news on draft night?!

Yes, the Knicks selected RJ Barrett with the No. 3 overall pick, a Knicks pick that was met with loud cheers for the first time … ever? I have my concerns about a shooting guard who couldn't shoot 3s or at the line efficiently, but it was nice to hear Knicks fans be happy. They got their homegrown talent who seems genuinely thrilled to be a Knick. I sincerely hope he finds his jumper, because the NBA is better when its biggest market has something to root for.

Losers

Phoenix Suns 

I really don't know what the Phoenix Suns are doing. First, they traded T.J. Warren and his remaining $35 million over three years into the Pacers' cap space. Warren, 25 years old, is a big wing scorer who shot 43 percent from downtown last season, providing a really good insurance policy for Indiana free agent Bojan Bogdanovic. And you give him away along with the 32nd pick for cash considerations?

This is a deal you make if you're a title contender looking to add a premiere free agent. But the Suns are going nowhere and they punted on Warren and got next to nothing. This is a new front office led by veteran GM Jeff Bower, but I'm not a fan of their start. Maybe they have D'Angelo Russell in their sights with their resulting cap space, but even then, I don't love his fit next to Devin Booker. Deandre Ayton will have to be Bill Russell to clean up the backcourt's mistakes.

And then they traded down from No. 6 for Dario Saric and the No. 11 pick, but reached for the oldest player in the draft, Cameron Johnson. Look, the UNC product is an elite shooter on the wing, but I worry about his age and hip issues. Bone impingement and a torn labrum is what has devastated Isaiah Thomas' career, so hopefully he's put those health issues behind him. Phoenix's brass must've heard that Johnson was promised shortly after No. 11 because most intel had him projected to be a late first-rounder, at best. 

For a team that finished with the second-worst record in the NBA, this wasn't much of a reward for their futility.

Hats

I kinda like the goofy hats atop the giant manes of the draftees, but we need to update the hat logos to reflect the teams they're actually going to play for. Do we really need to put a Lakers hat on DeAndre Hunter after that pick was traded not once, but twice? Let's bring the draft into 2019.

Washington Wizards

The Wizards were an awful defensive team last season, ranking 27th in defensive efficiency and traded Otto Porter for two score-first-and-second players in Jabari Parker and Bobby Portis. With interim GM Tommy Shephard steering the decisions for the club, I expected the Zards to target a defensive presence at the No. 9 pick, someone like Brandon Clarke who reminds me a lot of Shawn Marion with his elite finishing ability and versatility on the defensive end. Clarke is only 6-foot-8 with a short wingspan, but he had the instincts and athleticism to block over three shots a game for Gonzaga. (I love him in Memphis next to Jaren Jackson Jr.)

Instead, the Wizards went with Clarke's teammate at Gonzaga in Rui Hachimura, who fits the mold of a younger Parker. I like Hachimura's scoring abilities around the rim, but this team needs more impact players on the defensive end and I think they missed out on Clarke. Getting Simmons from Philly makes some sense on the wing, but then again, coach Brett Brown, looking for defensive players on the wing, didn't trust him much at all in the playoffs. Admiral Schofield is a solid flier in the second round with the 42nd pick they netted from the Sixers, but that's a steep price with cash considerations going to Philly. Again, where is the defense going to come from for this team? The good news is Bradley Beal is still a Wizard. No desperate moves from Washington. 

Boston Celtics

It really seems like the Celtics have given up on the 2019-20 season already. By trading Aron Baynes to Phoenix and not moving up in the draft with their bevy of picks, the Celtics have essentially reverted back to the team that rallied to the 2018 Eastern Conference Finals without Kyrie Irving.

But that team had Al Horford, who is an essential part to everything that they do. They'll need Horford to compete next season, but right now, Jayson Tatum, Gordon Hayward and Robert Williams will be their starting frontcourt next season. I'm not high on Romeo Langford (No. 14), but I love the Grant Williams pick at No. 24. (Jaylen Brown and Williams, the son of a NASA engineer, should stream weekly Academic Bowls.)

No one outside New England is feeling sorry for this team. But between Danny Ainge's health scare and the surprising exodus out of Boston, this has been a sad chapter for the franchise. 

Look, they might make a run for Kemba Walker, who went to UConn just 85 miles down the road, but the comments out of the team on Thursday night suggest this will be a rebuild. Just a year ago, the Celtics held one of the brightest futures in the league. Now, they're a cautionary tale.

Bol Bol

No one wants to be the guy that lingers in the green room on draft night, but I'm happy he landed in Denver. For the second year in a row, the Nuggets take a rehab flier on a top prospect. Last year it was Michael Porter Jr., who was the 14th pick dealing with back issues. He had a redshirt season in Denver, which might be the outcome for Bol in 2019-20 while he rehabs from a broken foot.

Bol is more than worth the flier. The son of the late NBA legend Manute, Bol is a 7-foot-2 shooter with a 7-foot-7 wingspan and has some real NBA-caliber skill. I am stunned he fell all the way out of the first round, even with the foot injury. He's a top-10 talent. Good for the Nuggets to take a chance on Bol.

Follow me on Twitter (@TomHaberstroh) and bookmark NBCSports.com/Haberstroh for my latest stories, videos and podcasts.

Copyright CSNPhily
Contact Us