Counter Intelligence: Warm Countries Produce Baby Girls - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Counter Intelligence: Warm Countries Produce Baby Girls

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    Counter Intelligence: Warm Countries Produce Baby Girls
    New research suggests that mothers in cold climates are more likely to have boys and those in tropical areas have a better chance of giving birth to girls.

    See why girls are more likely to be born in warm climates in our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

    • If you want to have a baby girl, move somewhere warm. New research suggests that mothers in cold climates are more likely to have boys and those in tropical areas have a better chance of giving birth to girls. The lead researcher from the University of Georgia study speculates that ambient light and temperature of geographic locations could play a role in determining sex.
       
    • The G-20 protests have gotten violent -- and some bankers are hoping cash in on the riot. Traders are placing bets on the number of arrests during the demonstration outside of the summit in London, with the spread at 130-140. There are also reported pay-outs on the number of deaths that occur and if more than 20 protesters are injured by horses.  
       
    • TV Guide is scrapping the scroll. The "guide" channel offered viewers a schedule that automatically cycled through each station's program line-up.  The scroll quickly began obsolete as cable and satellite subscribers promoted their own guides. The entire TV Guide franchise is getting a face-lift and new owner Lionsgate may even toss out the brand name in favor of something fresh.
       
    • If some lawmakers get their way, Havana could be the next hottest Spring Break destination. A group of 20 U.S. senators is calling for a repeal of the ban on travel to and from Cuba. The ban was created in 1962 following Fidel Castro's rise to power in the country. 
       
    • Nine people accounted for 2,678 visits to the emergency room over a span of six years in Central Texas. Taxpayers footed the $3 million bill for the visits.