Animal Control Helps Capture Feral Cats

Less than a day after NBC10 reported about a Senior Citizen apartment complex overrun with feral cats, local animal control took action.

By David Chang
|  Wednesday, Jun 6, 2012  |  Updated 6:12 PM EDT
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Feral cats have invaded the Aloe Village Senior Complex in Galloway Township, N.J. On Wednesday Animal Control setup traps to help put a stop to the problem. NBC10's Ted Greenberg reports.

NBC10 Philadelphia -Ted Greenberg

Feral cats have invaded the Aloe Village Senior Complex in Galloway Township, N.J. On Wednesday Animal Control setup traps to help put a stop to the problem. NBC10's Ted Greenberg reports.

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Senior Citizen Complex Overrun by Cats

Residents at the Aloe Village Senior Citizen Complex in Galloway Township aren't happy about all the feral cats running around. Residents believe there are between 50 to 100 cats roaming around the complex. NBC10's Ted Greenberg reports.
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Less than a day after NBC10 reported about a Senior Citizen apartment complex overrun with feral cats, local animal control took action.

Residents and staffers at Aloe Village in Galloway Township say there are between 50 and 100 cats in the complex and surrounding woods, numbers that have significantly grown over the past few years as the animals multiply.

“They go to the bathroom on the porch,” said one resident.

“It stinks back here,” said another resident, Evelyn Koegler. “You can’t open the door because of the smell.”

Koegler says she was even bitten by one of the cats.

“I was shooing them and one grabbed a hold of my fingers,” said Koegler.

Raymond Lane, of Animal Capture & Control Services, went to the complex today and removed six newborn kittens from the area.

"That's another six cats that aren't going to be breeding," said Lane. “I’ll come back tomorrow and check on them and I’ll reset another two and we’ll do two at a time. This way they don’t get used to them as fast. You can actually get more the less traps you actually have. I’ve honestly been trapping here for about three years. You can trap for a while and then the cats get used to the traps and won’t get in them. You have to take breaks.”

The captured cats will go to the Atlantic County Animal Shelter which will determine if they're fit for adoption. Evelyn says she couldn't be happier.

"I really appreciate the fact that Channel 10 really helped me and really helped all the neighbors," said Evelyn. "We couldn't do anything about it but you did and we thank you."

Officials tell NBC10 it could take four months of trapping at least once a week to get the cat population under control. Animal Control also says residents need to stop feeding the cats, which only adds to the problem. 

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