Lori Loughlin

Lori Loughlin, Husband to Serve Prison Time in College Admissions Scandal

The "Full House" actress and her fashion designer husband have agreed to plead guilty to paying $500,000 to get their daughters into the University of Southern California as crew recruits

NBCUniversal, Inc.

Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, have agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy charges in connection with the college admissions scandal, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Both will serve time in prison under the terms of their plea agreements.

Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, have agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy charges in the college admissions scandal.

U.S. & World

Stories that affect your life across the U.S. and around the world.

Virus Updates: Record High Level of New Infections in Florida

For Some Parents, Day Care Still Feels Risky

Loughlin, who played Aunt Becky on the sitcom "Full House," and Giannulli, were scheduled to go on trial in October on charges that they paid $500,000 to get their daughters into the University of Southern California as crew recruits even though neither girl was a rower. They had previously denied paying bribes and said they believed their payments were legitimate donations.

Prosecutors said Loughlin, 56, and Giannulli, 56, both of Los Angeles, Calif., helped create fake athletic profiles for their daughters by sending the consultant at the center of the scheme, Rick Singer, photos of their teens posing on rowing machines. The money was funneled through a sham charity operated by Singer, who has pleaded guilty to orchestrating the scheme.

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Massachusetts said the couple will plead guilty on Friday via video conference. Loughlin will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, while Giannulli will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and honest services wire and mail fraud.

The college admissions scandal led to the arrests of dozens of wealthy and influential people. Jackie Bruno takes a closer look at two of the celebrities involved in the case.

Under the terms of the plea deal, Loughlin will serve two months in prison, pay a $150,000 fine and be on supervised release for two years with 100 hours of community service. Giannulli will serve five months in prison, pay a $250,000 fine and be on supervised release for two years with 250 hours of community service.

Prosecutors have agreed to dismiss charges of money laundering and federal programs bribery that were added after the case was filed.

“Under the plea agreements filed today, these defendants will serve prison terms reflecting their respective roles in a conspiracy to corrupt the college admissions process and which are consistent with prior sentences in this case," U.S. Attorney Andrew E. Lelling said in a statement. "We will continue to pursue accountability for undermining the integrity of college admissions."

An attorney for the couple declined to comment.

Loughlin and Giannulli were among 50 people charged last year in the case dubbed "Operation Varsity Blues." Authorities said wealthy parents paid huge sums to secure their admissions at elite schools as fake athletic recruits or have someone cheat on their entrance exams.

Nearly two dozen parents have already pleaded guilty in the case, including "Desperate Housewives" actress Felicity Huffman. She served nearly two weeks in prison after she admitted to paying $15,000 to have someone correct her daughter's entrance exam answers.

Actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband Mossimo Giannulli are due back in Boston federal court to discuss potential conflicts of interest regarding their lawyers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Contact Us