Dario Saric's Shooting Display Could Be Sign of Things to Come - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Dario Saric's Shooting Display Could Be Sign of Things to Come

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    Dario Saric's Shooting Display Could Be Sign of Things to Come
    CSNPhilly.com
    Dario Saric's shooting display could be sign of things to come

    UNIONDALE, N.Y. - In a four-minute span, forward Dario Saric showed just how valuable he could be to the Sixers this season coming off the bench.

    The 6-foot-10 big man sank four three-pointers to start the second quarter of the Sixers' 133-114 cruise past the Nets Wednesday night (see observations), with his assigned defender - $64 million man Timofey Mozgov - oftentimes barely in the same zip code. 

    Mozgov outweighs Saric by 52 pounds, and the Sixers' sophomore was able to use that to his advantage to generate open looks.

    "It's easy, because I can drive, too, and he's sometimes in a difficult position," Saric said. "If he goes to step out on me a little bit more, I can drive. If he stays too low down there, I can shoot like I did tonight. I like having guys like that."

    Mozgov committed the error of hanging too far back on Saric time and again. On Saric's fourth and final three-pointer of his second-quarter shooting spree, Mozgov committed to staying low in the paint and turned his head away from Saric as Robert Covington drove to the rim.

    Saric backpedaled to the left corner and by the time Mozgov could even raise his arms above his head to contest the shot, the ball had already left Saric's fingertips and was well on its way towards giving the Sixers a 44-27 lead.

    Coach Brett Brown said before the exhibition contest began that he planned on tightening up the team's rotation. Saric wound up playing a shade over 24 minutes off the bench and led the team in field goal attempts (14), made field goals (10) and made three-pointers (5).

    Though much of the focus on Wednesday's game surrounded center Joel Embiid's first action on the court since the meniscus injury that ended his 2016-17 campaign in January and his new $148 million contract extension, Saric's performance did not go unnoticed. In the postgame media scrum, Brown asked that the second question out of reporters' mouths touch on Saric.

    After a reporter complied with the fifth-year coach's request, Brown waxed eloquently, eventually touching on Saric's flexibility. Saric could wind up playing significant minutes spelling different starters in various roles.

    "It makes him just a really fantastic sort of teammate and an improving player," Brown said. "You forget sometimes that he's only going into his second year."

    The fact that Saric - who was unanimously voted to the NBA All-Rookie First Team last season - will likely spend 2017-18 coming off the bench and rotating into various spots on the Sixers' lineup demonstrates just how far the team has come in the span of one offseason. Brown is now the beneficiary of roster flexibility and depth he never had in prior campaigns.

    If Saric's three-point shooting form can hold up once the season starts, he may become a weapon beyond what even Brown could have envisioned. Saric shot just 31.1 percent from beyond the arc last year but has hit six of his 13 shots from distance in his two games of preseason action, good for a 46.2 percent clip.

    "I think that in the first game I was a little bit slow in the game, but this game I understood how to play," Saric said. "I remember how it goes in an NBA game and of course, sometimes you need this game before the season.

    "I hope I have so many games like this during the season and I hope I find myself and do the right things."