Government Lawsuit Against Lance Armstrong Can Go Ahead: Judge | NBC 10 Philadelphia

Government Lawsuit Against Lance Armstrong Can Go Ahead: Judge

The government is seeking damages nearing $100 million, about three times what USPS paid in sponsorships to Armstrong's team, the U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling Team

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File
    In this Feb. 22, 2009, file photo, Lance Armstrong prepares for the final stage of the Tour of California cycling race in Rancho Bernardo, California.

    A federal judge has allowed a civil lawsuit brought by the U.S. government against disgraced former pro cyclist Lance Armstrong to proceed, tossing aside Armstrong's arguments that the case should be dismissed, NBC News reported.

    The Justice Department alleges in the lawsuit, made under the False Claims Act, that Armstrong, a seven-time Tour de France winner, defrauded the government by doping while sponsored by the U.S. Postal Service. The Justice Department declined to comment Tuesday.

    From 2000 to 2004, the Postal Service paid Armstrong's team, the aptly named U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling Team, a little more than $32 million, most of which went to Armstrong because he was the team's star rider, according to court filings.

    But the government is seeking damages nearing $100 million, about three times what USPS paid in sponsorships to the Postal Service Team during periods that fall within the False Claims Act's statute of limitations.

    Pence to Conservatives: 'This Is Our Time'

    [NATL] Pence to Conservatives: 'This Is Our Time'
    Vice President Mike Pence spoke at the Conservative Political Action Conference Thursday evening in National Harbor, Maryland. It was the ninth time that Pence has spoken at the gathering, but the first in his new role as vice president.
    (Published Friday, Feb. 24, 2017)