House Speaker Paul Ryan Waves 'Terrible Towel' Despite Being in Ohio | NBC 10 Philadelphia
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

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House Speaker Paul Ryan Waves 'Terrible Towel' Despite Being in Ohio

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    Jul 18, 2016: Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., holds up a "Terrible Towel"

    The Speaker of the House, in an attempt to play to a crowd of Pennsylvanians waved a "Terrible Towel," despite being in Cleveland, a city home to the Pittsburgh Steelers' bitter rival. Paul Ryan Waves 'Terrible Towel'Paul Ryan Waves 'Terrible Towel'House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., wants to win in November so badly that he waved a Pittsburgh Steelers "Terrible towel" in an attempt to drum up support in battleground state Pennsylvania. (Published Tuesday, July 19, 2016)

    Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the GOP's vice presidential nominee in 2012, spoke to the Pennsylvania Republican delegation Monday. Although Democrats have carried that state in six consecutive presidential elections, the race between Trump and presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is competitive.

    Ryan is a die-hard Green Bay Packers football fan, but waved a yellow and black "Terrible Towel," an iconic symbol of Pittsburgh Steelers fans.

    "I want to win this election so darn badly that I am willing to do this!" Ryan proclaimed as he waved the towel.

    He later said with a laugh while holding up the yellow towel again, "don't get me started," after acknowledging some Philly fans were also likely in the room. "You guys are NFC," said Ryan as some people shouted "Eagles." Ryan said his hope was for a Steelers-Packers Super Bowl (the Pack and Eagles are both in the NFC so both couldn't be in the Super Bowl). Day One of the Republican National ConventionDay One of the Republican National ConventionDay one of the RNC in Ohio brought some chaos to the floor. NBC10's Lauren Mayk spoke to delegates caught in the shouting match. (Published Monday, July 18, 2016)

    Ryan planned to speak Wednesday to Republicans from Ohio, a must-win swing state for presidential candidates in recent decades. And also a state that's home to two of the Steelers divisional rivals, the Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati Bengals.