Collapse on June 5, 2013 in Center City Philadelphia killed 6 and injured 13 people

Property History of Building Collapse

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter announced that the city has set up a perimeter around the area of the Center City building collapse. Several people have been injured. Crews continue to search for a least two people who are reported missing. (Published Wednesday, Jun 5, 2013)

    Here is a look at the property history of the building that collapsed on a Salvation Army Thrift Store resutling in six deaths and 13 injuries this morning in Center City Philadelphia.

    According to city property records, STB Investments Corporation located on JFK Boulevard owns the property. STB paid $385,894 for the nearly 4,200-square-foot property at 2136-2138 Market Street in 1994.

    The current market value for the property in nearly $2.6 million and the property is zoned as a multi-story office.

    L&I commissioner Carlton Williams told reporters on the scene that the Griffin-Campbell Construction was doing demolition on the property.

    Commissioner Ayers Speaks on Collapse

    [PHI] Commissioner Ayers Speaks on Collapse
    Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers updates us with the latest information on the Center City building collapse that happened on 22nd & Market Streets Wednesday. (Published Wednesday, Jun 5, 2013)

    "No existing violations on the property. It was permitted and the contractor did have a license," Williams said.

    The exterior condition of the property, however, was listed as "below average," by the city's property assessment office.

    Demolition permits were obtained earlier this year to completely demolish the four-story property on 16,616 square feet of prime Center City real estate.

    The first complete demolition permit was issued Feb. 1 to Philadelphia architect Plato Marinakos. The same man obtained a second permit four days later, according to Philadelphia License and Inspection records.

    Getting the permits is where Marinakos’ involvement with the property ended, spokesman Preston Moritz told NBC10.com

    Moritz said that Marinakos, who owns Plato Studio, offers expedition services for companies looking for construction permits.

    Marinakos’ office was paid by developer STB Investments and the Philly-based demolition firm to speed up the process and ensure the permit was obtained. Moritz says that Marinakos had nothing to do with the planning, execution or any other parts of the property at any time and didn’t sign off on any blueprints.

    A man, who did not want to be identified, recorded video of the demolition of the building on Sunday and sent it to NBC10.com.

     


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