Garth Brooks Sued, Ex-Partner Calls Country Star "Paranoid," "Vindictive" Man

View Comments ()
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    Country singer Garth Brooks

    Garth Brooks's former production partner is one unhappy camper.

    Lisa Sanderson alleges in a lawsuit filed today that the country-music superstar repeatedly got in her way over the years as she tried to negotiate lucrative deals for him and then never made good on a 50-50 profit-sharing agreement.

    But the singer's camp is firing back. "Mr. Brooks, of course, denies everything in the lawsuit filed today by Lisa Sanderson. Mr. Brooks and Red Strokes Entertainment Inc. will continue to take the necessary steps toward resolving this matter through the legal system," a rep for Red Strokes, Brooks' production company, told E! News Monday.

    Meanwhile, Sanderson claims in court documents obtained by E! News that Brooks' everyman appeal is a ruse and he is actually a "paranoid, angry, deceitful and vindictive man who will turn against those closest to him on a dime."

    "Defiance": A Show and a Game

    [NATL] "Defiance": A Show and a Game
    Syfy has created the holy grail of entertainment, a science fiction TV show and interactive game. "Defiance" is set to premiere on April 15 on the Syfy channel at 9/8 p.m. Take a look at how the game and show intersect. (Published Friday, Apr 12, 2013)

    View the lawsuit

    She went to work for Red Strokes in 1994 to help develop film and TV projects for him, Sanderson states in the lawsuit, but his "unreasonable demands torpedoes nearly all of the potential deals that came there way."

    Brooks promised to pay her half of the profits from production deals that went through, she claims in the suit, as well as a $250,000 bonus for "loyalty and years of service." She states that she "never received a dime of her fifty percent share of the producer fee" and stopped receiving proper compensation from Red Strokes in May 2011.

    Alleging fraud, breach of oral agreement, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and violation of the California Labor Code section that requires an employer to make good on all due wages and bonuses when an individual's employment is terminated, Sanderson is seeking $425,000, plus other damages.

    PHOTOS: See the stars who came out for the 2013 ACM Awards