Most Hated Cop Resigns - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Most Hated Cop Resigns

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    Most Hated Cop Resigns
    Dallas Police Department
    Ryan Moats has taken the high road and has accepted an apology by Dallas police officer Robert Powell (pictured) after the officer lectured him on his attitude while his mother-in-law died in a Dallas hospital.

    Dallas police officer Robert Powell, potentially the most hated cop, has decided to step-down following the nationally publicized controversy with former Philadelphia Eagle, Ryan Moats.

    The announcement was made just before noon Wednesday and Powell released the following statement:

    "With a heavy heart and great sadness, I resigned from the Dallas Police Department this morning.

    I made this decision in the hope that my resignation will allow the Dallas Police Department, my fellow officers, and the citizens of Dallas to better reflect on this experience, learn from the mistakes made, and move forward.

    I still hope to speak with the Moats family to personally express my deep regret, sympathy, and to apologize for my poor judgment and unprofessional conduct.

    I also want to apologize to my fellow officers. I have sincere respect and admiration for the men and women of the Dallas Police Department and the work they perform daily, and I wish them well."

    On March 18, Powell pulled out his gun and threatened Houston Texans running back (and former Philadelphia Eagle) Ryan Moats with jail as the player pleaded to go inside the hospital to be with his dying mother-in-law. She died before he got there.

    Powell spoke with CBS  11 News in Dallas about the poor judgment, the regret and the subsequent death threats he is now receiving.

    "If I were in that situation again, I would take them inside, let them be with their mother, which is where they needed to be, and if I could take it back I would," he told CBS 11's J.D. Miles.

    "I've gotten many emails, not all of them very nice. It has been difficult. We're worried about our two young children," said Powell.

    The officer denied the allegation he pointed his gun at Moats and his wife, Tamishia.

    "When I found there was not a threat, I did re-holster my weapon immediately," he said. He pulled out his gun when the couple got out of the car against his orders, Powell told Miles.

    This interview comes after Powell issued an apology through his attorneys:

    "I wish to publicly and sincerely apologize to the Moats family, my colleagues in the Dallas Police Department, and to all those who have been rightfully angered by my actions on March 18, 2009. After stopping Mr. Moats’ vehicle, I showed poor judgment and insensitivity to Mr. Moats and his family by my words and actions. With great remorse I accept my responsibility for adding to their grief in an already difficult time.  

    I have attempted to reach Mr. Moats to express my personal condolences directly to his family and my regret about my actions. While these efforts have been unsuccessful so far, I hope we can talk soon.

    Again, I am very sorry for what I did and ask for the forgiveness of all those touched by these unfortunate events."

    Moats said Monday on ABC's "Good Morning America" that he accepts Powell's apology and hopes it was sincere.

    Moats' wife said it would be comforting to hear the apology personally, but that she too would definitely accept it.

    Officer Powell's actions have humiliated the Dallas Police Department and embarrassed city leaders. City Council Member Angela Hunt wanted Powell dismissed from the force.

    "Powell's behavior indicates a lack of common sense and common decency, and he should not continue to serve on our police force," Hunt wrote in her online blog.

    And this revelation won't help his case -- since the incident with Moats became public last week, former Dallas Cowboys linebacker Zach Thomas stepped forward and said Powell mistreated and arrested his wife after she made an illegal u-turn last July.

    Powell is currently on paid leave pending the results of an internal police investigation.