Robert Hagg Finds Himself the Odd Man Out Vs. Rangers

Rookie Robert Hagg will be a healthy scratch for the first time in his career following his performance Tuesday in Detroit, where the defenseman played just 12:39 and finished with a minus-2 rating, including just four shifts and 2:28 during the Flyers' third-period comeback.

Hagg missed four games with a lower-body injury, and when he returned he played on the left side, paired with Radko Gudas. For most of the second half of the season, Hagg has played the right side with Andrew MacDonald as the team's second pairing.

"It's not always about the individual," head coach Dave Hakstol said. "The pair (Hagg and Gudas) didn't have easy chemistry there. We ended up in some situations with and against the speed and ended up with some bad gaps. The pair and combination wasn't as effective as we needed it to be."

Lyon in the crease
If Hakstol wanted to be a very unconventional think-outside-the-box coach, he would start Petr Mrazek for a period and then bring in Alex Lyon for the remaining two periods and beyond.

Lyon will start tonight's game against the Rangers, the same team he earned his first career win against after replacing Michal Neuvirth following the first period. 

Some of Lyon's best work this season has been coming in cold off the bench. He owns a .970 save percentage in games he has entered in relief, and a pedestrian .890 save percentage in five games he has started.

"It's not just based on one performance, it never is," Hakstol said. " It's always based on situation and a player's body of work. Alex's body of work has been good. He came in the other night and did an excellent job and that's part of the decision."

Shorthanded shortcomings
The Red Wings scored the tenth shorthanded goal against the Flyers Tuesday, matching the Colorado Avalanche for the most 5-on-4 goals allowed this season. 

This season, the Flyers are 4-4-2 in games in which they've given up a shorthanded goal, but more importantly, many of those goals have been momentum killers - the difference between tying a game or facing a two-goal deficit.

In the Flyers' 5-1 loss to the Rangers on Jan. 16, New York forward Paul Carey scored shorthanded with ten seconds remaining in the first period that extended the Rangers lead to 3-1, and took away any hope for a Flyers' comeback.    

"The Rangers are going to come with the kitchen sink on their penalty kill and they're playing without a lot of pressure," Hakstol said. "At times, you're going to see two, three and four guys on their PK come up the ice offensively, so we're going to have to do a very good job of that tonight." 

Much of the blame can be attributed to the power play's 1-3-1 setup - Shayne Gostisbehere serving as the only player on the point with Claude Giroux and Jake Voracek in the circles, Sean Couturier in the high slot and Wayne Simmonds down low.

When a turnover or giveaway is committed between the circles and the blue line, typically only Gostisbehere or the player taking his spot at the point is the only player back to defend, leaving the Flyers wide open for a two-on-one shorthanded chance against.   

"We starting off taking a chance with one defenseman out there," Gostisbehere said. "That's just the name of the game. I don't think there's too many power play units with two D out there right now. I think for us, it's staying within ourselves and keeping it simple."

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