Orionid Meteor Shower Light Up the Night Sky

The meteors should've be visible to the naked eye, too, though light pollution may make them harder to see

ev_20151013_083107A_10A-Orionid-meteor
NASA, File

A cosmic fireworks show lit up the sky Friday night as the Earth passed through a field of meteoroids.

The Orionid meteor shower was caused by Earth's orbit through a debris field left by Halley's Comet, and it peaked Friday and into Saturday.

Friday was a moonless night, too, according to NASA, meaning that — barring cloud cover — up to 10 to 15 meteors per hour were visible before dawn.

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The meteors should've be visible to the naked eye, too, though light pollution may make them harder to see.

People in the Northeast were treated to an appetizer Wednesday when a fireball flew across the sky Wednesday, visible from Delaware and Pennsylvania to New Hampshire, according to the American Meteor Society. The bright flash of light, caused by a meteor, was sighted by about 200 people.

The American Meteor Society gives the peak of Orionid activity as Sunday — noting that it's hard to predict meteor activity precisely.

Copyright AP - Associated Press
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