Iraq Base: US Contractor Denies Security Risks, Prostitution - NBC 10 Philadelphia
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Iraq Base: US Contractor Denies Security Risks, Prostitution

The company first called allegations that managers had shut down sex trafficking investigations "absurd," but later acknowledged that senior management had re-opened the probe months later

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Iraq Base: US Contractor Denies Security Risks, Prostitution
    AP
    Steve Anderson, a former employee of Sallyport Global, is interviewed by The Associated Press, Thursday, April 27, 2017, in New York. Anderson says his managers pressured him to sign off on faked manifests for aircraft carrying smuggled alcohol.

    An embattled U.S. contractor accused of failing to promptly disclose sex trafficking, alcohol smuggling and security violations on a nearly $700 million contract to secure an Iraqi air base has denied many of the charges. Investigators who uncovered those findings were fired by Sallyport Global in March, but their attorney says the company's explanations don't stand up to scrutiny.

    The revelations published Wednesday by The Associated Press were based on documents and interviews with multiple former employees.

    The company first called allegations that managers had shut down sex trafficking investigations "absurd," but later acknowledged that senior management had re-opened the probe months later. Investigators found the new prostitution charges unfounded but said their attempts to interview key suspects in the first case were blocked.


    Raqqa's Devastation Shows Entire Neighborhoods Destroyed

    [NATL] Raqqa's Devastation Shows Entire Neighborhoods Destroyed

    Shells of buildings, concrete slabs littering dust-choked streets and destroyed cars are all that is left of whole neighborhoods in Raqqa, Syria, after weeks of fighting and bombings between Islamic State militants and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces, backed by the U.S.

    (Published Friday, Oct. 20, 2017)