Report: Eagles Interested in Bills WRs Coach Sanjay Lal

The Eagles fired Greg Lewis on Tuesday, so now they have to find a wide receivers coach to take his place. 

We have our first name. 

The team has "strong interest" in Bills receivers coach Sanjay Lal, according to ESPN's Adam Caplan.

While Lewis, 36, had never been an NFL position coach before the Eagles hired him last offseason, Lal has significant experience. 

The 47-year-old just finished his second season as the Bills wide receivers coach and has been a receivers coach in the NFL since 2009. He held the position with the Jets from 2012-14 and with the Raiders from 2009-11. Before that, he was an assistant receivers/quality control coach with the Raiders. 

With the Bills' firing of Rex Ryan, their position coaches have uncertain futures. 

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A big problem with the Eagles' receivers group -- aside from an obvious lack of talent -- is unfulfilled potential. The Eagles started the season with a first-round pick, two second-round picks and a third-round pick at the position. And the only player who had a good season was Jordan Matthews. 

Nelson Agholor, the team's first-round pick from 2015, was slightly better in his second season but wasn't able to come near fulfilling his potential. 

Lal should know something about unfulfilled potential. In 2009, his first season as the Raiders' wide receivers coach, the team drafted Darrius Heyward-Bey with the seventh-overall pick. In his first two seasons, Heyward-Bey had numbers worse than Agholor's. But in his third season, and Lal's last with the team, Heyward-Bey caught 64 passes for 975 yards and four touchdowns. It's the best season he's ever had in the NFL. 

Maybe the Eagles want to see if Lal could squeeze some production out of their disappointing receivers. 

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