8 NFL Draft Prospects to Watch in CFP National Championship

It's time to crown the college football national champion.

It's also our last chance to get a look at some NFL prospects before postseason All-Star games and the combine.

Here are eight prospects to watch in tonight's CFP National Championship.

Philadelphia Eagles

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Alabama vs. Clemson
Mercedes Benz Stadium
8 p.m., ESPN

Georgia

No. 27 - Nick Chubb, RB, senior (5-10/225)

Chubb fits the mold of a bell cow back. He had a ridiculous freshman season filling in for an injured Todd Gurley in which he ran for 1,547 yards on 7.1 per carry. Chubb then suffered a gruesome knee injury of his own the following season. Chubb could've come out after a so-so junior campaign in 2016 but opted to return for his senior year. And boy, did that move work. Chubb rushed for 1,320 yards this season and 15 TDs while sharing time with the player listed below. If not for the injury history, Chubb would easily be considered the second-best back in the draft behind Penn State's Saquon Barkley. The Eagles' biggest need certainly isn't at running back, but with a loaded class and questions about Jay Ajayi's chronic knee issues going forward, it's certainly worth looking into.

No. 1 - Sony Michel, RB, senior (5-11/215)
The other half of Georgia's dynamic rushing attack has seen his stock rise, especially after his 181-yard, three-TD performance against Oklahoma. For the season, Michel has also gone over the 1,000-yard mark while averaging eight yards a carry with 16 TDs. Despite a couple productive seasons in 2015 and 2016, this season has really gotten Michel on to the NFL draft radar. A strong combine could only boost his stock.

No. 7 - Lorenzo Carter, EDGE, senior (6-6/243)
I would love to profile stud LB Roquan Smith, but with how he's played recently, it's hard to imagine him falling out of the top 15, let alone to wherever the Eagles pick. Carter fits the mold of former Bulldog and first-round pick Leonard Floyd (Bears). Much like Floyd, Carter never reached his full potential as a pass rusher in college (14 career sacks) because of his role. But as was the case with Floyd, someone will fall in love with his measurables. Could that team be the Eagles? Carter would be an intriguing rotational pass rush piece.

No. 6 - Javon Wims, WR, senior (6-4/215)
Wims has quietly had a solid season for Georgia and provided true freshman QB Jake Fromm with a reliable target. Wims led the Bulldogs in receptions (44), receiving yards (704) and TDs (7). While the numbers aren't mind blowing, Wims has one distinguishable NFL trait: size. That size helps him beat press coverage and make contested catches, two important things at the next level. Wims also has sneaky quickness, which was evident against Oklahoma. He ran several hitches where he stopped on a dime and hauled in a couple easy completions.

Alabama

No. 9 - Bo Scarbrough, RB, junior (6-2/235)

The bruising back gained a ton of hype after monster performances in the CFP last season. After beating up Washington's highly-touted defense (180 yards, two TDs), Scarbrough was having a similar performance against Clemson in the title game (93 yards, two TDs) before breaking his leg in the third quarter. Whether it's lingering effects from the injury or other factors, Scarbrough just hasn't had the same impact this season. He's rushed for just 573 yards on 4.8 yards a carry. His freakish physique and physical running style will intrigue somebody in the middle rounds. If the Eagles want a smash-mouth heir apparent to LeGarrette Blount, Scarbrough could be that guy.

No. 34 - Damien Harris, RB, junior (5-11/221)
Part of the reason for Scarbrough's lack of production is the emergence of Harris. With 17 yards tonight, Harris will have back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons. That's impressive considering his timeshare at the position and playing with a run-heavy QB in Jalen Hurts. Harris may have come into the season less heralded than Scarbrough, but he'll end it being the better NFL prospect. He's a complete back and could be a steal in this deep class.  

No. 3 - Calvin Ridley, WR, junior (6-1/190)
Serious question: how does a program with a consistently inept passing game snag all these stud receivers? Following in the footsteps of Julio Jones and Amari Cooper, Ridley will likely be the next 'Bama wideout to be a first-round pick. After an impressive 1,045-yard, seven-touchdown freshman season, Ridley hasn't reached the 1,000-yard plateau in either of the last two campaigns (65 yards would get him there tonight, however). But the numbers don't tell the whole story. Ridley is lightning quick and an outstanding route runner. He has decent size and can take the top off a defense (his ability to track deep balls is also exceptional) . Most consider him to be the draft's second-best receiver behind SMU's Courtland Sutton. That's probably fair, but neither receiver is expected to go in the top 15. If Ridley somehow falls to the Eagles in the 20s, they should take a long, hard look. He'd be an outstanding complement to Alshon Jeffery and give Carson Wentz another dangerous weapon.

No. 32 - Rashaan Evans, LB, senior (6-3/234)
Evans is at the heart of Alabama's stellar defense. The senior 'backer recorded 66 tackles (11 1/2 for a loss) and six sacks. He's not the easiest player to evaluate because of the run-heavy SEC and how clean the Crimson Tide's stout front keeps him. But what Evans does show is solid instincts and great burst. He trusts his eyes and doesn't over commit on fakes. He's a strong blitzer (he was recruited as an edge rusher) and plays a violent brand of football. In the small sample size of coverage snaps he has, he's looked solid. His time at MLB will serve him well, but he might be best served as a weak side linebacker at the next level. One that might look pretty good next to a (hopefully) healthy Jordan Hicks.

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