10 More Crazy Nick Foles Playoff Stats

10 more crazy Nick Foles playoff stats CSNPhilly.com

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Nick Foles is a Super Bowl MVP. He's also a human stats machine.

Four years ago, Foles had one of the greatest regular seasons in NFL history. This year, he had one of the greatest postseasons in NFL history.

He's a stat lover's dream.

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With that said, here are our 10 best Nick Foles stats in this week's edition of 10 Mind-Boggling Nick Foles Stats.

1. We start with the single most mind-boggling Nick Foles stat ever: In the second half of his four career playoff games, Foles has thrown a combined 14 incomplete passes. He's 48-for-62 in the second half in his postseason career, which is an insane 77.4 percent (Kurt Warner is second all-time at 68.0 percent). He's thrown for 544 yards with five TDs and no interceptions, good for an astronomical 130.4 passer rating. That's highest in NFL history for the second half, far ahead of second-place Drew Brees (111.9), giving Westlake High in Austin the top two spots.

2. Foles now has four career playoff games with a passer rating of 100 or more. Only 13 quarterbacks in NFL history have had more. Six of them are in the Hall of Fame, and four are Hall of Fame locks. Among quarterbacks in their 20s, only Troy Aikman (8), Joe Flacco (6), Russell Wilson (6), Tom Brady (5), Brett Favre (5) and Aaron Rodgers (5) have had more.

3. Foles is now atop the all-time NFL lists in postseason completion percentage at 71.9 percent and passer rating 113.2 (minimum of 100 attempts).

4. There were eight touchdown passes of 30 yards or more in the entire postseason this year, and three of them were by Foles. In 16 playoff games with the Eagles, Donovan McNabb threw only two more TDs of 30 yards or more than Foles has thrown in four games.

5. Foles' streak of four straight postseason games with a passer rating of 100 or more is fourth-longest in NFL history, behind only Joe Montana (8 games), Matt Ryan (5) and Joe Flacco (5). Troy Aikman and Bart Starr also had four-game streaks.

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6. Foles has more playoff wins before his 30th birthday than 26 of 32 modern-era quarterbacks in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His three playoff wins are second-most among active quarterbacks currently in their 20s, behind only Wilson's eight.

7. Foles' passer rating of 115.7 for the entire postseason is ninth-highest in NFL history, and his 72.6 percent accuracy is third-highest, behind only Montana in 1989 (78.3 percent) and Troy Aikman in 1993 (74.4 percent). Foles is only the third quarterback to win a Super Bowl after completing 65 percent or more of his passes with one or fewer interceptions in each postseason game. The others are Brady and Montana.

8. Foles became the fourth quarterback in history to throw for 350 yards with one or fewer interception and 65 percent accuracy in a Super Bowl. Only Foles and Brady have done that in a Super Bowl win.

9. We know Nick Foles is the first quarterback to catch a touchdown pass in a Super Bowl. But he's also the only the third player in NFL history - in the regular season or postseason - with three touchdown passes and a touchdown catch in the same game. Frank Ryan of the Rams did it against the Lions in 1960 and former Eagle Jim McMahon of the Bears did it in 1985 against the Redskins. Foles is the only Eagles quarterback to ever catch a touchdown pass in any game.

10. And this: Foles' game-winning touchdown pass to Zach Ertz with 2:21 left was the third-latest go-ahead, game-winning TD pass in Super Bowl history. The only later game-winning TDs were Eli Manning's 13-yarder to Plaxico Burress with 35 seconds left in Super Bowl XLII, which turned a 14-10 deficit into a 17-14 win over the Patriots, and Ben Roethlisberger's six-yard TD to Santonio Holmes, also with 35 seconds left, in Super Bowl XLIII against the Cards, turning a 23-20 deficit into a 27-23 win.