Former Sixer Woolridge Dead at 52 - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Former Sixer Woolridge Dead at 52

13-Year NBA vet spent his final season scoring double digits for the Sixers

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Former Sixer Woolridge Dead at 52
    Getty Images
    Orlando Woolridge played 13 seasons in the NBA. He died Thursday. He was 52.

    Orlando Woolridge, the rugged forward who carved out a reputation over 13 NBA seasons as a scoring specialist and one of the original alley-oop artists, died late Thursday at his parents' home in Mansfield, La. He was 52.

    DeSoto Parish Chief Deputy Coroner Billy Locke said Woolridge died while under hospice care for a chronic heart condition.

    The 6-foot-9 Woolridge was the sixth overall pick by the Chicago Bulls in 1981 after starring at Notre Dame in college and Mansfield High School in Louisiana.

    Known for his high-flying dunks and ability to throw down lob passes in the open court, Woolridge played for the Bulls, Los Angeles Lakers, New Jersey, Denver, Milwaukee and Detroit before wrapping up his career playing 74 games for the 199-94 Sixers.

    He averaged 16.0 points in just over 28 minutes per game, quickly emerging as an offensive spark plug no matter if he was in the starting lineup or coming off the bench.

    “I just love it when we go up in the transition game, up and down the court, Magic (Johnson) looking for the open guy,” Woolridge told Lakers broadcaster Chick Hearn shortly after joining the team in 1988. “I get excited when we start playing like that. That's the way I love playing.”

    He participated in one of the greatest slam dunk contests of all time in 1985, competing against Michael Jordan, Dominique Wilkins and Julius Erving, among others, and he averaged 22.9 points per game for the Bulls in 1984-85, the last player to lead Chicago in scoring before Jordan took over.

    “He was a good person,” said Timberwolves assistant T.R. Dunn, who played with Woolridge for one season in Denver. “He was a really good offensive player, athletic, could run the floor, score the basketball. He had a pretty solid career. Just a fun-loving, athletic guy. Just sad news.”

    Woolridge was suspended for violating the league's substance abuse policy in 1987, but returned to play eight more seasons in the league. A scorer to the end, he averaged 12.7 points per game in 26 minutes during his final season with the 76ers.

    “He was such an energetic-type, big player,” said Wolves assistant Jack Sikma, who played against Woolridge. “He really was one of the early athletic-type players to come in the league, where we see a lot more of that now.”

    After ending his NBA career, Woolridge spent his final two seasons playing professionally in Italy. He also coached the Los Angeles Sparks of the WNBA.

    One of Woolridge's defining moments came as a senior at Notre Dame in 1981, when he hit a buzzer-beating jumper to beat Ralph Sampson and No. 1 Virginia on national television, ending the mighty Cavaliers' 28-game winning streak.  Woolridge averaged 10.6 points in 109 games at Notre Dame, helping the Fighting Irish reach the NCAA Tournament in each of his four seasons, including the Final Four as a freshman in 1978.

    Woolridge is survived by his three children, Zachary, Renaldo and Tiana; by his parents, Mattie and Larnceen; his sister, Dr. Vanessa Woolridge Duplessis; his brother-in-law, Darren Duplessis; and his nephew, Nigel Duplessis.


    Fan, follow and download: Get the latest from NBC10.com anytime, anywhere. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and NBC Philadelphia. Sign up for our sports newsletter. And, get breaking news delivered right to your mobile phone -- just text PHIBREAKING to 639710 to sign up. (Message and data rates may apply.)