LeBron and the Knicks Need to Get a Room - NBC 10 Philadelphia

LeBron and the Knicks Need to Get a Room

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    NEWSLETTERS

    LeBron and the Knicks Need to Get a Room
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    It must be tough when everyone's fawning over your hot superstar girlfriend.

    The Cavs beat the Knicks down Tuesday night, 119-101, like a boyfriend tired of fools flirting with his girl. 

    When you think about it, Cleveland had to do something. The New York media hard-on for James was such that it crossed the line into rudeness; you can admire the beauty of some guy's girlfriend from afar, but you can't just start licking her the way everyone has lapped LeBron's booty the last couple media cycles. Did the days of chivalry leave with Isiah Thomas?

    The long stares into each other's eyes at the pre-game press conference had to be a little embarrassing for Cavaliers fans. I mean if I was writing this post for NBC Cleveland, I'd be pretty damn pissed off at all the touchy-feely wink-wink going on. 

    But all things considered, the Cavs team did the best and only thing they could do: 1. Punch the harmless Knicks in the face. 2. Punch them one more time, in the second quarter, to make sure they were knocked out (D'Antoni's prolific offense put up 16 in the 2nd quarter; they were down almost 30 at the half.) 3. Leave the building for bigger things with their hot wife still in tow. 

    And this wasn't a fired-up Cavs team that put the Knicks in their place; very little chest-pounding or throwing up of hands by the visitors. This was a dismissive, confident, "Excuse us, we're trying to win a championship this year. Also, your team is ugly and untalented and could never handle our wife" type of effort.

    It's true. For all the potential Big Star-in-a-Big City synergy a marriage of King James and New York creates, there's one huge reason LeBron would stay right where he is: The Cavs are a better team. Much better. 

    Now will that be the case in 2010, when Ilgauskas turns 247, and Ben Wallace's 'fro is receding like a November sunset?  We don't know.

    But in 2008, it's clear, the Knicks can't yet provide the championship lifestyle a player of LeBron's caliber demands.