Police Arrest 181 at Hearing on GOP Health Care Bill

Protesters chanting "No cuts for Medicaid, save our liberty!" were forcibly removed from the Senate Finance Committee room Monday as lawmakers attempted to convene a hearing into the Republican Graham Cassidy health care bill.

(Published Monday, Sept. 25, 2017)

U.S. Capitol Police arrested 181 people during demonstrations outside a hearing room where U.S. senators were discussing a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare.”

The Graham-Cassidy Bill, considered by some Republicans as their last chance to make changes to health care law, appeared all but dead late Monday. But earlier in the day, protesters had to be cleared from the hearing room, chanting, "No cuts to Medicaid, save our liberty!"

With a possible government shutdown looming, here is a look at how a shutdown would affect the country.

(Published Friday, Jan. 19, 2018)

Fifteen people were arrested and charged with disruption of Congress. The hearing resumed after an 18-minute delay.

Outside the hearing room, more protesters continued to chant and yell. Capitol Police arrested 166 people after they refused to clear the hallways.

The Office of Management and Budget director is calling it the "Schumer Shutdown" and blaming the deadlock on Democrats insistent on immediate immigration reform as the deadline for Congress to pass a new budget bill looms. Mick Mulvaney says some federal agencies will still be open, though workers will be expected to work without pay,

(Published Friday, Jan. 19, 2018)

Police said some demonstrators, as part of their protest activities, removed themselves from wheelchairs and mobility devices and got down on the floor. Police were later able to reunite the people with their devices.

The last-gasp Republican drive to tear down President Barack Obama's health care law essentially died Monday as Maine Sen. Susan Collins joined a small but decisive cluster of GOP senators in opposing the push.

Speaker Paul Ryan spoke briefly after the House passed a bill to continue funding the government. He implored Democratic senators to pass the bill to avoid a shutdown.  

(Published Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018)

The Maine moderate said in a statement that the legislation would make "devastating" cuts in the Medicaid program for poor and disabled people, drive up premiums for millions and weaken protections Obama's law gives people with pre-existing medical conditions. She said the legislation is "deeply flawed," despite eleventh-hour changes its sponsors have made in search of support.

The only way Republicans could resuscitate their push would be to change opposing senators' minds, which they've tried unsuccessfully to do for months. Collins told reporters that she made her decision despite a phone call from President Donald Trump, who's been futilely trying to press unhappy GOP senators to back the measure.

Frustration is setting in on Capitol Hill as lawmakers continue to negotiate a new spending bill and avoid a government shutdown.

The budget is being held up up by differences over DACA, the Obama-era program protecting undocumented immigrants brought here as children

(Published Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018)