Remembering Hurricane Katrina 10 Years Later

It was 10 years ago on Aug. 29, 2005, that Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans.

22 photos
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
A makeshift tomb at a New Orleans street corner conceals a body that had been lying on the sidewalk for days in the wake of Hurricane Katrina on Sunday, Sept. 4, 2005. The message reads, "Here lies Vera. God Help Us."
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AP
New Orleans residents walk through floodwaters that besiege the Crescent City on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Hurricane Katrina devastated the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts when it came ashore on Monday.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Debris from a fallen building covers several buildings in downtown New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina battered the Louisiana Coast on Monday, Aug. 29, 2005.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
A New Orleans resident walks through floodwaters coated with a fine layer of oil in the flooded downtown area on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Hurricane Katrina pounded the area when it made landfall Monday and water is still rising in the Crescent City.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Lambert toasts an overhead helicopter as he carries his "Life Goes On" sign through the historic French Quarter in New Orleans, La., Sunday, Sept. 4, 2005. Lambert participates in the Decadence Parade, an annual gay celebration event.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
A couple is shown on a rooftop Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005 in St. Bernard Parish near New Orleans.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers for the Gulfport water and sewage department, Joe Dobson, left and Roderick Stapleton attempt to change a valve on a drinking water line which had burst causing a flood in Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005.
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AP
Reginald Banks pulls his uncle's tool box through foot high mud in Violet, La., in St. Bernard Parish, Saturday Sept. 17, 2005. Much of St. Bernard Parish was covered in mud in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Evacuees from New Orleans cover the floor of Houston's Astrodome Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005.
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AP
A military helicopter drops a sandbag as work continues to repair the 17th Street canal levee Monday, Sept. 5, 2005, in New Orleans.
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AP
This is an aerial view of a flooded neighborhood on the east side of New Orleans, La., Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005 after Hurricane Katrina passed through the area last Monday morning.
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Getty Images
Rodney Thomas, 41, of New Orleans, sits on a downed tree while waiting for a ride out of town August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Thomas rode out the storm in uptown New Orleans and came downtown to see what was left of the city. Hundreds of volunteers brought flat boats and air boats to help rescue stranded people.
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Men ride in a boat in high water past Flood Street after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm.
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A woman is carried out of flood waters after being trapped in her home in Orleans parish during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Katrina made landfall as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds in excess of 135 mph.
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Jason Biggs pushes his wife Diane on a raft down Canal Street, flooded by Hurricane Katrina, August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Sixty people were dead and thousands left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama when Katrina roared ashore yesterday, cutting off power and leaving much of New Orleans flooded by water up to 20 feet deep in some areas.
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A police officer keeps watch as people walk through water in downtown after Hurricane Katrina August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm.
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A woman crosses a flooded Bourbon Street in the French Quarter August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm.
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Fidelis Okonkwo (R) holds his 7-month-old daughter Obina as he and his family load into a pickup truck on Canal Street August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm.
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Firefighters arrive at a store on fire on Canal Street August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm.
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People on Canal St. use a boat to get to higher ground as water began to fill the streets August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Thousands of people are left homeless after Hurricane Katrina hit the area yesterday morning.
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An unidentified man carries a bird and a cat after being rescued from a house where water levels surpassed the first floor after Hurricane Katrina blew through August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. Looting has been reported in New Orleans, mostly empty due to the storm.
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Al Duvernay (L) lowers Rusty the dog into his boat while rescuing people stranded by the Hurricane Katrina's floodwaters August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. Looting has been reported in New Orleans, mostly empty due to the storm.
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