Chicago Public Schools Cancel Classes as Strike Continues - NBC 10 Philadelphia
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Chicago Public Schools Cancel Classes as Strike Continues

Monday's cancellation is the eighth school day impacted by the strike

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Chicago Teachers Union Rally at Union Park

    Members and supporters of the Chicago Teachers Union gathered at Union Park on Saturday during the second weekend of the strike. NBC 5's Chris Hush reports.

    (Published Saturday, Oct. 26, 2019)

    Chicago Public Schools students will miss an eighth straight day of classes on Monday, as the teachers strike enters its third week.

    CPS made the announcement on Sunday afternoon, saying that they were informed by Chicago Teachers Union leadership that there is “no possibility” that a deal will be reached during negotiations this weekend.

    The cancellation marks the eighth straight school day affected by the strike, which began on Oct. 17. The two sides have cited progress made in negotiations in recent days, but remain apart on key points of contention.

    At a Sunday night news conference, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced SEIU Local 73, a union representing support staff, was reviewing the final terms of a potential agreement.

    Mayor Lightfoot said she was "terribly disappointed” that city officials weren't able to announce a deal with the CTU on Sunday night.

    "We put everything we could responsibly on the table to get a deal done," Lightfoot said.

    The Chicago Public Schools Chief Education Officer LaTanya McDade said Sunday that the district is offering a fair contract that goes toward providing what students need for an equitable education. But she says the district must be financially responsible.

    Chicago Teachers Union President Jesse Sharkey says the city's latest offer is $38 million short of what the union is seeking in its most recent proposal. However, CPS chief operating officer Arnie Rivera says the difference in the proposals discussed by the two sides Saturday is closer to $100 million on an annualized basis.

    "After being on strike for several days, why would we put a deal on the table for $38 million if it isn't enough?" CTU Vice President Stacy Davis Gates said in response to the discrepancy.

    Teachers went on strike Oct. 17, canceling school for more than 300,000 students.