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What Do Jehovah's Witnesses Believe?

All information was gathered from the Jehovah’s Witnesses official website, and independent researchers.

— According religion archive Patheos, the faith was founded out of the Christian Millerite movement and has spread around the world.

— The group took the name Jehovah’s Witnesses in 1931, and also created a strong structure that helped grow the organization.

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— According to the official website, there are more than 8.3 million Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide, and almost 120,000 congregations.

— According to Pew, Jehovah’s Witnesses are racially diverse, being 36 percent White, 32 percent Hispanic, and 27 percent Black.

— Jehovah’s Witnesses root their faith directly in Biblical text and ignore human interpretations. Therefore they do not celebrate traditionally Christian holidays like Easter and Christmas.

— Unlike traditional Christianity, they view God as the only higher power. While they believe Jesus is the son of God, they reject the belief that he and the Holy Spirit are equal to God.

— Jehovah’s Witnesses do not believe in purgatory, and also believe that after one dies, one's existence completely stops, with the possibility of being resurrected by God.

— Their teachings follow the belief that Satan is the source of all evil, and that protection from Satan can be achieved via faith and study with other members of the faith.

— Jehovah’s Witnesses have no clergy, but rather task congregations with choosing elders. The elders are typically older man who become the main teachers and counselors.

— Best know from going door-to-door in a neighborhood near you, Jehovah’s Witnesses stop at houses to preach their beliefs to “make disciples of people of all the nations.”

— Jehovah’s Witnesses do not accept blood transfusions; do not believe in going to war, and do not claim the cross as a symbol of Christianity.

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