family tragedy

Man Kills Dad and Brother After Believing They Were Possessed, Police Say

A man is accused of shooting and killing his father and brother inside a Philadelphia home after believing they were both possessed.

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What to Know

  • A man is accused of shooting and killing his father and brother inside a Philadelphia home after believing they were both possessed.
  • The double homicide took place inside a home on Walnut Lane in the West Oak Lane neighborhood.
  • Anslem Callender, 62, was arrested and charged in the murder of his father, 83-year-old Arnin Callender and his brother, 59-year-old Ancil Callender.

A man is accused of shooting and killing his father and brother inside a Philadelphia home after believing they were both possessed.

Anslem Callender, 62, was arrested and charged in the murder of his father, 83-year-old Arnin Callender, and his brother, 59-year-old Ancil Callender.

Officers arrived at the East Walnut Lane home in the West Oak Lane neighborhood around 12:45 a.m. Tuesday to find Anslem Callender sitting in a chair, Police Capt. Lee Strollo said. He surrendered peacefully and was taken into custody.

A search of the home revealed Arnin and Ancil Callender dead in the basement, Strollo said.

A relative said that the two victims are from New Jersey and were staying in the home after they all attended a funeral in Maryland. Police confirmed the victims were staying with Anslem Callender following a funeral.

While being interviewed by police, Anslem Callender allegedly said he killed his father and brother because he believed they were both "possessed."

“We don’t know if there is mental illness involved or some kind of argument,” Strollo said.

Investigators said they found a 9mm handgun and a shotgun inside the home. Six shots were fired from the handgun while the shotgun had two spent shell casings, according to police. Investigators also said there were signs of a fight in the basement.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HELP: The National Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-799-7233 or 800-787-3224 (TTY) provides people in distress, or those around them, with 24-hour support.

There are additional resources for people or communities that have endured gun violence. Further information can be found here.

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