3 Men Black Out After Meeting Women at High-End NYC Bars

Two women are preying on men in Manhattan, meeting them at high-end bars, then possibly drugging them, going back to their hotel rooms and robbing them once they pass out, authorities say.

(Published Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017)

Two women are preying on men in Manhattan, meeting them at high-end bars, then possibly drugging them, going back to their hotel rooms and robbing them once they pass out, authorities say.

Police couldn't immediately confirm the men had been drugged, but in each of the three reported cases, the men reported feeling dizzy and blacking out in their rooms after taking the women back.

The series of thefts happened over a period of three days, the first on Aug. 11. In that case, police say the 38-year-old victim met a woman at The Standard and both went back to his room at The Dream Hotel on West 16th Street. The victim told cops he felt dizzy once inside the room and lost consciousness. When he woke up, his watch was gone.

Two days later, on Sunday, a 37-year-old man met one of the two suspects at STK on West 12th Street and both went back to his room at the Sofitel Hotel on West 44th Street. Again, the man reported feeling dizzy and blacking out. When he awoke, his watch was gone, cops said.

The most recent case was Aug. 16, when a 56-year-old man met a woman at Gaby, a restaurant attached to the Sofitel Hotel where he was staying, and both went back to his room. He too felt dizzy and passed out. When he came to, he noticed two watches, a bag and a pen were gone.

The first suspect is described as being in her 30s with brown hair; she's about 5 feet 5 inches tall. The second is also in her 30s and about the same height; she has blonde hair with pink highlights.

Anyone with information about the woman is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS.

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