Is Trump Racist? Xenophobic? Local Congress Members React to President's Tweet Tirade Against Minority Congresswomen - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Is Trump Racist? Xenophobic? Local Congress Members React to President's Tweet Tirade Against Minority Congresswomen

U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania issued a statement Monday morning, becoming the first GOP senator to do so

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Local Residents and Politicians React to Controversial Trump Tweet

    After President Trump attacked four congresswomen on Twitter, some of his supporters say his words were out of line and even racist. NBC10 got reactions from local politicians and residents, including supporters of the president. 

    (Published Monday, July 15, 2019)

    Is President Donald Trump racist? Xenophobic? Or simply an angry tweeter?

    Many elected representatives to Congress from the Philadelphia region appear to think the answer is yes — to all of the above.

    That's according to their reactions to the president’s three Sunday morning tweets in which he told four female, minority congress members to go back to “broken and crime infested” countries they came from.

    (All four are American citizens, and only one was born outside the United States.)

    The four he attacked on Twitter are Democratic U.S. representatives Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan.

    Here are the reactions from local lawmakers in Congress. They include four Republicans and 13 Democrats. U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, included below, became the first Republican senator to issue a statement on the tweets.

    U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, Republican of Pennsylvania

    "President Trump was wrong to suggest that four left-wing congresswomen should go back to where they came from. Three of the four were born in America and the citizenship of all four is as valid as mine. I couldn’t disagree more with these congresswomen’s views on immigration, socialism, national security, and virtually every policy issue. But they are entitled to their opinions, however misguided they may be. We should defeat their ideas on the merits, not on the basis of their ancestry."

    U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, Democrat of Pennsylvania

    U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez, Democrat of New Jersey

    U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, Democrat of New Jersey

    U.S. Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick, Republican representing Pennsylvania's 1st District

    "As the Vice-Chair of the Bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, Congressman Fitzpatrick has repeatedly stressed the critical need for civility in our discourse, from the kitchen table to the White House and everywhere in between. Pointing out differences in policy proposals is ok. Personal attacks on others are not ok."

    U.S. Rep. Brendan Boyle, Democrat representing Pennsylvania's 2nd District

    U.S. Rep. Dwight Evans, Democrat representing Pennsylvania's 3rd District

    U.S. Rep. Madeleine Dean, Democrat representing Pennsylvania's 4th District

    U.S. Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, Democrat representing Pennsylvania's 5th District

    U.S. Rep. Chrissy Houlahan, Democrat representing Pennsylvania's 6th District

    U.S. Rep. Susan Wild, Democrat representing Pennsylvania's 7th District

    U.S. Rep. Lloyd Smucker, Republican representing Pennsylvania's 11th District

    U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross, Democrat representing New Jersey's 1st District

    U.S. Rep. Jeff Van Drew, Democrat representing New Jersey's 2nd District

    "Elected officials need to stop with the name calling and hateful statements. Instead of focusing on real issues, we have heard all manner of appalling remarks from those who would rather distract from them. It is time to grow up. This behavior is shameful and disgusting. We were elected to work together and help keep this country the greatest nation in the world. We have major issues to tackle and we keep blocking our own path to solving them. Enough is enough."

    U.S. Rep. Andy Kim, Democrat representing New Jersey's 3rd District

    "This language has no place in our politics. The presidency is a job that needs to transcend our politics and must not descend into name-calling and knife-fighting. I worked in the Oval Office and the Situation Room before, and it saddens me greatly to see such attacks coming from the White House, a building my immigrant parents were so proud to bring me to visit when I was a child. We have real challenges in our country and our politics are making it much harder to try and find solutions. The President should focus on helping those in need by lowering prescription drug costs and addressing the opioid epidemic, instead of launching unacceptable attacks against those he disagrees with."

    U.S. Rep. Chris Smith, Republican representing New Jersey's 4th District

    - Did not issue a statement; could not be reached for comment

    U.S. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, Democrat representing New Jersey's 12th District