Patients of Unsanitary Pennsylvania Dentist Could Have Been Exposed to HIV, Hepatitis, Dept. of Health Says - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Patients of Unsanitary Pennsylvania Dentist Could Have Been Exposed to HIV, Hepatitis, Dept. of Health Says

People treated at Cotturo Dental Associates from Jan. 1, 2017 to Sept. 14, 2018 could be at risk for infectious disease due to unsanitary conditions, the Pennsylvania Department of Health says.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Officials Warn Patients of Dirty Dentist

    There is a huge scare for patients at a now closed dental office in Northampton County. They are being told to get tested for HIV and Hepatitis, because the office failed to dispose used needles and sterilize equipment, investigators say.

    (Published Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018)

    What to Know

    • People treated at Cotturo Dental Associates from Jan. 1, 2017 to Sept. 14, 2018 could be at risk for infectious disease, health dept. says.

    • Health department investigators found that the dental office didn’t follow proper sanitation and cleaning measures.

    • Dentist Palmer Cotturo surrendered his license in September.

    Patients of a now shuttered eastern Pennsylvania dental office are being asked to get tested for HIV and hepatitis after state health officials allegedly found unsanitary conditions.

    The Department of Health began investigating Cotturo Dental Associates operated by Palmer Cotturo in Mt. Bethel, Northamptom County, in August.

    Health department investigators found that the dental office didn’t follow the proper procedures to prevent infections. The office didn’t properly clean, disinfect or sterilize devices leading to an infection risk, the health department said.

    Cotturo surrendered his license in September, health officials said.

    Health officials urge any patients treated at the office from Jan. 1, 2017 to Sept. 14, 2018 to get tested for HIV and Hepatitis B and C.

    Former patients of Cotturo flooded Mt. Bethel area doctor's offices this week looking to get tested for the infectious diseases.

    “I had to go get blood work done right across the street,” patient Thomas Depuy said.

    "It was kind of odd that he was using utensils that weren’t in the sanitary packages,” Depuy said after being tested. “He brought them in and set them on the tray there were no packaging or nothing.”

    Cotturo's office was dark Wednesday, the phone disconnected and keys still in the door.

    NBC10 has been unable to reach Cotturo for comment.

    The blood tests could take three to five days to come back.