Local Colleges Could Suffer If Pa. Budget Isn't Fixed

Local universities are struggling while their funding is on hold, but how is this impacting students? Some students say tuition is already too high. NBC10's Aundrea Cline-Thomas spoke to local students about their concerns.

(Published Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017)

The collapse of budget negotiations is leaving state aid to five Pennsylvania universities in limbo three months into the fiscal year.

Pennsylvania needs money to pay for aid before the chamber sends legislation to Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, House Republican Leader Dave Reed said. However, the House is unwilling to deliver a tax package that Wolf deems large enough to deal with Pennsylvania's deficit.

That budget showdown is stalling nearly $600 million in aid to Penn State, Pitt, Temple, Lincoln and Penn's veterinary school, plus authorization for another $52 million for Penn State's agricultural research and extension programs.

The schools provide services to the state or tuition discounts to in-state students - both of which are in jeapordy as budget talks

Wolf's proposed budget does not include the "annual appropriation to support clinical services, research and scholarship" to Penn vet, school officials said.

"Funding from the commonwealth ensures the Vet School’s ability to deliver life-saving services at its two animal hospitals, advance research programs that support the agricultural industry, and maintain our commitment to developing and growing the veterinary profession," the school said.

The Pennsylvania Capitol will be empty Thursday, and the House has no plans to return before Oct. 16.

This story is developing. Please Check back for updates.