La Salle Prof Allegedly Had Lap Dances in Class - NBC 10 Philadelphia

La Salle Prof Allegedly Had Lap Dances in Class

University investigating professor who allegedly hired strippers for conference

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    Prof. Accused of Using Lap Dances as a Teaching Tool

    La Salle Assistant Professor Jack Rappaport is being investigated for allegedly including strippers at a symposium -- reportedly a teaching tool for students. In his faculty and staff bio on the school's website, Rappaport's talks about the use of "real life applications" as a teaching tool. (Published Monday, April 11, 2011)

    La Salle University has launched an investigation into a teacher accused of hiring strippers for a symposium to give him and students lap dances, a university spokesman says.

    The professor, known for using "real life applications" in his classes, allegedly used the lap dancers as a teaching tool on business ethics.

    "I think it was suppposed to be something about the strippers really control the person who's paying for what they're getting versus you're paying and you're in control," said Fran Maxwell, a La Salle student who'd heard about the symposium.

    Jack Rappaport, known as "Jack Rap" on campus, is an assistant professor of management who teaches course in statistics, problem solving and operations management. He held a March 21 symposium in which participants paid $150 to attend. The students who attended also earned credits for their participation.

    At the conference, three strippers gave lap dances to Rappaport and to students who agreed to it, according to a Philadelphia City Paper blog post by Emily Apisa.

    The conference had something to do with “the application of Platonic and Hegelian ethics to business,” according to Apisa’s post.

    The symposium was stopped when School of Business Dean Paul Brazina stepped into the room.

    In addition to his teaching duties, Rappaport serves on the university’s committee on academic integrity, according to his online profile.

    “I try to enrich my teaching by using interesting real life applications such as the use of the horse race betting market in the teaching of statistics,” Rappaport writes on his university profile page.

    La Salle's Director of Media Relations Jon Caroulis sent NBC Philadelphia a statement saying the school is "very concerned" about the reported incident and it is launching a "full-scale investigation."

    "Until the investigation has been completed, it would be unfair to those involved to disclose any further information, let alone suspicions or allegations," the statement says.