Coronavirus Pandemic

Full coverage of the COVID-19 outbreak and how it impacts you
SEPTA

SEPTA Gets Rid of Front-Door Boarding, Reduces Number of Riders

Starting Wednesday, customers will be asked to board and exit from the rear doors while front-door boarding will be reserved for riders with disabilities. SEPTA is also suspending on-board fare payment

NBC Universal, Inc.

SEPTA will have riders board and exit buses and trolleys through the back door, suspend on-board fare payment, and reduce the number of riders as part of its ongoing efforts to maintain social distancing amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

Starting Wednesday, customers will be asked to board and exit from the rear doors while front-door boarding will be reserved for riders with disabilities. SEPTA is also suspending on-board fare payment. 

SEPTA officials say the changes will help passengers maintain a safe distance between one another. 

SEPTA will also limit the number of riders to 20 at the most on buses, 25 at the most on trolleys and 30 at the most on the Norristown High Speed Line. Operators will keep track of the number of people on board and if a vehicle reaches the maximum, service will be limited to drop-offs only until there is enough space for new riders to get on. 

SEPTA will also convert the Route 101 trolley to a bus service and suspend the Route 102 trolley. Route 102 riders can find bus alternatives on SEPTA’s website.

The changes came after concerns of driver and operator safety raised by TWU Local 234, the union that represents SEPTA workers.

In New Jersey, NJ Transit also made changes to its public transportation services. The agency announced Wednesday that NJ Transit bus tickets and passes will be accepted on all of its trains, though it encouraged people to only use its service for essential needs or "to help."

Contact Us