Delaware

Lawsuit Over Delaware School's Hybrid Learning Dismissed

The lawsuit filed on behalf of a Cape Henlopen High School student against the Lewes district was dropped after an agreement between the two parties

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A lawsuit accusing a Delaware high school of violating a student's constitutional rights with its hybrid learning plan has been dismissed.

The lawsuit filed on behalf of a Cape Henlopen High School student against the Lewes district was dropped after an agreement between the two parties, the school system and an attorney for the student announced Friday.

The senior student, who was only referred to by her initials, alleged the district did not provide students opting to learn online amid the coronavirus pandemic with equal education opportunities, The Delaware News Journal reported, citing the suit.

The school’s learning plan split students into groups: those who chose to attend classes in person, and those who decided to take online classes. In-person students attended classes two days a week and worked remotely for the other three, while online-only students received instruction using a video application once a week, the news outlet reported.

The suit argued the system put virtual students at an educational disadvantage and senior students at a competitive disadvantage when applying to college.

The student chose to attend class remotely because of health risks faced by her mother. School officials told the student's mother that they did not have enough teachers to offer equal time to hybrid and virtual students, the lawsuit said.

The attorney representing the student said Friday that the district agreed to provide additional virtual learning opportunities.

The district said in a statement that the lawsuit had been dropped as a result. School officials said they were satisfied with the outcome, and added that the school's hybrid learning plan "did not change due to the lawsuit.”

Copyright AP - Associated Press
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