Get Inside (the Cockpit) of Boeing’s Dreamliner

Take a peek inside the Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner that uses less fuel while bringing new features including dimmable windows to travelers. NBC10 goes on board as the new plane visits Philadelphia International Airport.

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NBC10 Philadelphia - Dan Stamm
The cockpit can fit up to four pilots.
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On Tuesday we showed you a glimpse of the new Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner arriving in Philadelphia. On Wednesday we got inside the plane -- even inside the cockpit -- to show some of the upgrades passengers can expect when they board the Dreamliner.
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Let's take a step inside the 186-foot long aircraft.
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For the Dreamliner tour a large section of the plane was left open. It really showed off space available in the twin-aisle configuration.
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The plane can fit 210 to 250 passengers. Boeing says how many seats it fits is up to the airline.
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Leg room is also up to the airlines.
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The seats can each feature a TV that is lighter -- weighing less is a theme of the Dreamliner.
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The plane can weigh up to 502,500 pounds at takeoff but it still weighs less than planes of the past meaning the Dreamliner uses 20 percent less fuel than comparable planes.
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The better seats should still feature some pretty impressive TVs.
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But enough about bigger TVS -- travelers will love these larger and lower overhead compartments.
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The bins are big enough on the outside that they can fit four rolling suitcases sideways.
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There is also something special with the windows.
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Using an electrified gel, the windows can be dimmed without the use of a blind.
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Flight attendants can even control the darkness of the windows while still allowing people to see out.
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There is also something special in the Dreamliner's bathrooms.
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The bathroom uses less water meaning that the plane can save not only H2O but also weight.
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Dependent on whether you lift just the lid or the lid and the seat, the auto-flush toilet can tell what type of business you need to do.
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The bathroom is a little roomier than most airplane bathrooms and uses a different color scheme.
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The galley is even more efficeint.
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Let's take a rare look inside the cockpit.
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Veteran Capt. Mike Bryan gave us a tour of what makes this cockpit unique.
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Let's take a look at what Capt. Bryan sees.
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The cockpit is a little roomier thanks to fewer buttons.
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The screens are also thinner and lighter.
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The cockpit can fit up to four pilots.
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It also has some comfy seats that move sideways to allow the pilots easier access to the controls.
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Of course pilots and crew do get tired.
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This is the crew sleeping area that is never seen by the average travelers.
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It looks kind of like a rock band's tour bus.
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There is enough room to allow up to six crew members to relax on longer flights.
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As for what this airplane is hauling...
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These Rolls Royce engines can carry this plane at Mach 0.85.
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