Excessive Heat Warnings, Advisories in Effect for Region | NBC 10 Philadelphia
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NBC10 First Alert Severe Weather Central

Excessive Heat Warnings, Advisories in Effect for Region

People are cancelling their plans because of the excessive heat. NBC10's Pamela Osborne reports. (Published Thursday, July 14, 2016)

With temperatures expected to hit the 90s, excessive heat warnings and heat advisories were issued for much of the region for Thursday and Friday.
The Excessive Heat Warning will be in effect for parts or all of the following counties from noon Thursday until 8 p.m. Friday:

  • Burlington, NJ
  • Camden, NJ
  • Chester, PA
  • Delaware, PA
  • Gloucester, NJ
  • Mercer, NJ
  • Montgomery, PA
  • New Castle, DE
  • Philadelphia, PA

The Heat Advisory will be in effect for the rest of the Philadelphia region Thursday from noon to 8 p.m. Ways to Beat the HeatWays to Beat the Heat

Montgomery County declared a Cod Red Hot Weather Health Warning from noon Thursday to 6 p.m. Friday due to the heat. Philadelphia also issued a heat warning for Thursday and Friday. Philadelphia’s Heatline will be open Thursday from noon until midnight as well as Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. You can call the Heatline at 215-765-9040.

“We strongly urge the public to visit older friends, relatives and neighbors to ensure that air conditioners or fans are working and homes are adequately ventilated,” said Philadelphia Health Commissioner Thomas Farley. “In a heat wave, the majority of the victims are older people and those with pre-existing medical conditions.” NBC10 First Alert Weather: Heating UpNBC10 First Alert Weather: Heating UpFirst Alert Neighborhood Weather meteorologist Bill Henley has the latest on the oppressive heat. (Published Thursday, July 14, 2016)

Besides the elderly, other groups at risk during extreme heat include people with chronic medical conditions, pregnant women, small children, people who work in a high heat environment and people engaged in strenuous physical activity. Residents who don’t have air conditioning in their homes are also advised to go to shopping malls, movie theaters, senior centers and other public spaces with AC for at least some part of the day.

The Department of Health also provided the following tips to avoid heat-related illness:

  • Avoid, as much as possible, working or playing in the hot sun or other hot areas.  If you must be out in the sun, wear a head covering.  A wide brimmed hat or visor will not only protect your head from intense rays of the sun, it will also provide a shield for your eyes.
  • Use air conditioners and fans.  Open windows to release trapped hot air.
  • Those taking regular medication should consult with their physician.  Some medications cause an adverse reaction in hot weather.
  • Wear lightweight clothing.
  • Drink plenty of non-alcoholic liquids, warm or cool.  Because the body loses fluids in the heat, drinking lots of liquid helps to prevent dehydration.
  • Maintain a normal diet.
  • Shower or bathe in water that is near skin temperature.
  • Do not leave older people, children, or pets alone in cars.

Early symptoms of heat stress include decreased energy, slight loss of appetite, faintness, light-headedness and nausea. If you experience any of these symptoms go to a cool environment, drink fluids, remove excess clothing and rest.

Serious signs of heat stress include unconsciousness, rapid heartbeat, throbbing headache, dry skin, chest pain, mental confusion, irritability, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle cramps, staggering and difficulty breathing. If you experience any of these symptoms get medical attention immediately. CLICK HERE for more information on excessive heat.

And seniors in Camden County can call (856) 858-3220 with heat questions.

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