<![CDATA[NBC 10 Philadelphia - Philadelphia Weather News and Coverage]]> Copyright 2014 http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/weather/stories http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC10_40x125.png NBC 10 Philadelphia http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com en-us Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:59:46 -0400 Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:59:46 -0400 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Power Outages]]> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 05:43:57 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007695726_1200x675_312865859568.jpg Some area residents lost power during the strong storms overnight. Here's the latest outages.]]> <![CDATA[NBC10 First Alert Severe Weather Central]]> Fri, 02 May 2014 13:37:16 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/generic+umbrella+rain+storm.jpg

Photo Credit: Shutterstock]]>
<![CDATA[Remembering the Deadly Limerick Twp. Tornado]]> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:11:57 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Limerick-Tornado-New.jpg

Tom Walters still remembers the chaos in Limerick Township two decades ago when a violent tornado ripped through the Montgomery County town.

“We were literally using the doors that were blown off the house for stretchers,” Walters said.

Sunday marks the 20th anniversary of the event that changed the town forever. On July 27, 1994, a tornado touched down in Limerick around 11:45 p.m. The twister intensified to an F3 and had peak wind speeds between 158 and 206 mph, according to the National Weather Service.

“A twister in the middle of Ridge Pike,” said Walters, who was the Limerick Fire Chief at the time. “Dancing back and forth.”

The twister caused major devastation to “the Hamlet,” a housing development that was under construction at the time. The tornado destroyed 20 of the 27 occupied homes. It also killed a family of three while injuring 25 other people. A savings bond owned by one of the victims, a 10-month-old child, was found the next day in Bath, Pennsylvania, about 40 miles north, according to officials.

The tornado also tore through Limerick’s business area, causing over $5 million in property damage.

“Once you got over the shock and surprise, you had a job to do,” Walters said.

Today the devastating twister serves as a learning tool for the town. Fire officials say if a similar storm hit their town, they’re now  trained to be ready.

NBC10 aired a story on the Limerick twister last year. You can view it in the video embedded above.
 



Photo Credit: NBC10.com]]>
<![CDATA[Trees Topple, Streets Flood During Violent Storm]]> Wed, 16 Jul 2014 00:38:18 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Glassboro-Storm-Damage.jpg

Severe storms moved out of our area after heavy winds, flooding and hail struck the region.

High temperatures in the high 80's on Tuesday combined with high humidity to fuel Tuesday's thunderstorms.

"We're pretty primed," NBC10 First Alert Weather Chief Meteorologist Glenn "Hurricane" Schwartz said of the ripe storm conditions. The system brought and strong winds which reached speeds as fast as 60 miles per hour. 

The National Weather Service issued a Severe Thunderstorm Watch for the entire region warning of the dangerous weather potential. The Watch was canceled shortly after 8 p.m. however. Heavy rain in South Jersey, close to the shore as well as some areas north and west of Philadelphia still lingered late Tuesday night into Wednesday morning however.

Street and creek flooding occurred in parts of South Jersey and Delaware as well as Chester and Lancaster counties.

A Flood Warning is also in effect for the East Branch Brandywine Creek below Downingtown in Chester County until 8 a.m. on Wednesday. The creek is expected to rise to 7.7 feet. A Flood Advisory was also in effect for Berks, Lehigh, Monroe, Carbon and West Central Northampton Counties until 1 a.m. Finally, a Flash Flood Watch continues for Delaware and South Jersey until 6 a.m. on Wednesday.

The storms hit Burlington, Mercer and Ocean Counties around 3 p.m. and moved into Delaware around 3:30 p.m. In Mercer County a lightning strike hit a power line on Whitehourse Mercerville and Klockner Roads, starting a small fire. In Glassboro, Gloucester County, strong winds toppled trees and even caused small fires.

"Never seen it that bad before in my life," said Elaine Brigandi, a longtime Glassboro resident who witnessed a tree fall in her neighbor's yard. "I could hear the crack. I saw it coming toward the house and you're kind of like in shock in a way." 

In neighboring Washington Township, crews responded to three small fires sparked by lightning.

"Some electrical damage to the homes in each particular case but no serious fires," said Washington Township Fire Chief John Hoffman.

Despite the damage, power outages in the Glassboro area were not widespread.

In Pennsylvania, storms moved into the Philadelphia area late Tuesday afternoon. The violent wind caused a tree to fall on a car on the 5900 block of Palmetto Street in the Lawncrest section of the city. In North Philadelphia, another tree fell on the 4700 block of North Mascher Street. There were also reports of downed trees on Roosevelt Boulevard between Cottman Avenue and Ryan Avenue.

No one was hurt during any of the incidents.

The storms caused power outages though they were nowhere near as widespread as they were on Monday. As of 11 p.m., PECO reported 1300 outages, with around 900 in Philadelphia. AC Electric reported 182 outages, mostly in Glassboro in Tabernacle. PSE&G has around 40 outages, mostly in Mercer and Camden Counties.

The storms cleared the area by midnight though there were some leftover showers overnight into Wednesday morning. Much drier air will move in and humidity will drop dramatically Wednesday afternoon. The nice weather will continue Thursday and Friday with unseasonably low humidity. More clouds will then move in over the weekend with the chance of more storms on Sunday.

The NBC10 First Alert Weather team is tracking the weather pattern and updated information will be posted here.



Photo Credit: NBC10.com]]>
<![CDATA[Residents Face Aftermath of Severe Storms]]> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:15:36 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/180*120/72978013.jpg While most of our region was hit with severe storms Monday night, one of the towns struck hardest was Vorhees, Camden County, NJ. NBC10's Matt DeLucia spoke with neighbors who have some cleaning up to do. He reports from Vorhees.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Extreme Weather: Typhoon Rammasun]]> Wed, 16 Jul 2014 07:03:48 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/AP621344500048.jpg Take a look at some of the most extreme weather systems throughout the world.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Thousands Still Without Power ]]> Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:16:36 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/263*120/fc447b95c2d6445a9a278fa53c7586ca.jpg

Severe storms with heavy rain, lightning and high winds roared through the region Monday afternoon into Monday night, causing power outages for tens of thousands of customers. By Tuesday morning crews had gotten many back online, but some remain. Here are the numbers:

PENNSYLVANIA

PECO Energy

Chester County - 217

Delaware County - 119

Montgomery County - 24

Philadelphia County - 220

Bucks County - 86

PPL

Lehigh County - 11

 DELAWARE

Delmarva Power

New Castle - 28

 NEW JERSEY

PSE&G

Burlington County - 450

Camden - 354

Gloucester - 5

Mercer - 5

Atlantic City Electric -

Atlantic - Less than 5

Burlington - Less than 5

Camden - 5

Cape May - 18

Cumberland: 10

Gloucester - 10

Ocean - 0

Salem - Less than 5

Power Company Contact Info

DO NOT call 911 to tell emergency operators that your power is out. They will be dealing with real medical emergencies. You can use the following numbers to report your loss of power.

PECO

    Emergency: 1-800-841-4141 (24 hour service)
    Customer Service: 1-800-494-4000 (Mon through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sat. 9 p.m. to 1 p.m.)

PPL

    Emergency: 1-800-DIAL-PPL (1-800-342-5775 (24 hour service)
    Customer Service: 1-800-DIAL-PPL (1-800-342-5775) (Mon. through Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

Atlantic City Electric

    Emergency: 1-800-833-7476
    Customer Service: 1-800-642-3780

PSEG

    Emergency: 800-436-PSEG (7734) (24 hour service)

Delmarva

    Emergency: New Castle County (DE) and Cecil and Harford Counties (MD) 1-800-898-8042
    Kent and Sussex Counties (DE) and the Eastern Shore of Maryland 1-800-898-8045

American Red Cross Southeastern Pennsylvania

    Contact: 215-299-4000

]]>
<![CDATA[Delco Teen Struck by Lightning ]]> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:22:23 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Blue-Rocks-Baseball-Game-Wi.jpg

A teenage boy is recovering after he was struck by lightning in Glenolden, Pa.

Officials say the teen was on the unit block of East Ashland Avenue around 8 p.m. when lightning struck him in the hand.

The teen was taken to the Crozer-Chester Medical Center where he was treated for non-life-threatening injuries. Investigators say the teen was conscious and alert.

 



Photo Credit: Ashley]]>
<![CDATA[Powerful Lightning, Storm Images]]> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:05:39 -0400 Violent storms, lightning and a possible tornado hit the area on Monday. Check out our viewer photos of the storm. ]]> Violent storms, lightning and a possible tornado hit the area on Monday. Check out our viewer photos of the storm. ]]> http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/New-Lead-Lightning.jpg Violent storms, lightning and a possible tornado hit the area on Monday. Check out our viewer photos of the storm.

Photo Credit: Jack Bowker]]>
<![CDATA[Spectacular Supermoon Shots From Our Area]]> Sun, 13 Jul 2014 23:23:43 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/160*120/supermoon+aversa.jpg Stargazers throughout the world caught a glimpse of the "supermoon." A supermoon, or what astronomers call a perigee full moon, appears larger and brighter than usual. The celestial phenomenon will appear two more times this year. Look to the skies again Aug. 10 and Sept. 9.

Photo Credit: Dominic Aversa]]>
<![CDATA[Glenn Debunks Polar Vortex Myth]]> Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:43:15 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007567432_1200x675_302292035633.jpg Don't believe the vortex hype, says NBC10 First Alert Chief Meteorologist Glenn "Hurricane" Schwartz. ]]> <![CDATA[Looking Back at Hurricane Sandy's Devastation]]> Fri, 25 Oct 2013 14:33:10 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/storm-add-P1.jpg Hurricane Sandy started out as a tropical storm in the Caribbean, reached hurricane strength and then crashed into the mid-Atlantic states as a post-tropical cyclone in 2012. Take a look back at some of the most compelling photos from before and after.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Polar Vortex: Don't Believe the Hype]]> Sat, 12 Jul 2014 09:49:06 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/polar-vortex2.jpg

With news of temperatures in the 40s and 50s in the Great Lakes next week, talk of a polar vortex is running rampant.

Don’t believe the hype, says NBC10 First Alert Chief Meteorologist Glenn “Hurricane” Schwartz:

“It’s not the polar vortex,” Schwartz said. “It’s an unusually cool weather pattern that’s coming into, let’s say the Great Lakes area, and that happens even in July sometimes.

“That’s what the weather is: It varies. And so just because the weather is very cool or very hot, that doesn’t mean it’s anything unusual or freakish. Weather does change dramatically. That’s what makes it interesting.”

But the National Weather Service office in Chicago didn’t appear to get the message. This is what it tweeted Thursday with an accompanying “polar vortex” graphic:

Soon after, the main office of the National Weather Service made it clear the “polar vortex” was not at work. Its forecast discussion mentioned that "A DEEP UPPER LOW ... NOT THE POLAR VORTEX" would be swinging through the Great Lakes.

"I think people are pretty sensitive to those words," Amy Seeley, a meterologist with the National Weather Service, told the Associated Press.

She said the Chicago office quickly realized it made the wrong call.

“Some people like to write provocative headlines,” Schwartz said. “That happens in entertainment, it happens in politics, [and] it also happens in weather.”

]]>
<![CDATA[Flooding, Fire at the Shore]]> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 18:18:53 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007553940_1200x675_301536323792.jpg New Jersey is dealing with both flash floods and fire damage to several houses in Galloway as a result of storms.]]> <![CDATA[Severe T-Storm Watch Canceled ]]> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:43:48 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/180*120/Lightning+Bolt.JPG

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been canceled for the entire area.

Officials initially believed the system would drop severe storms over the region. They later determined that we're only in for some isolated showers and storms, though nothing severe.

The news is a relief for thousands of customers who are still without power after Tuesday's severe storm. The violent storms that pounded our region knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of households -- some of which won't get their power back on until Friday.

Thursday and Friday, we're seeing a chance of showers, but by Saturday we'll be enjoying mostly sunny skies with a high around 88.

Sadly, Sunday will bring with it more isolated thunderstorms breaking the streak for what would have been our eighth beautiful weekend in a row.

The stormy weather continues through the beginning of next week. By Wednesday, we'll be dry with partly cloudy skies.



Photo Credit: Sophia Cassidy]]>
<![CDATA[Power Won't Be Fully Restored Until Friday]]> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:43:48 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Tree+down+on+house.jpg

Violent storms knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses and now one of the region's largest electric utilities says some people will remain in the dark until Friday.

PECO Energy tells NBC10.com that it will take crews until the end of the week to get service restored to all customers affected by the powerful Tuesday night storm.

The severe line of thunderstorms barreled through the area around 7 p.m. Tuesday bringing torrential downpours and winds whipping up to 60 miles per hour.

"We just experienced a 65 mile per hour micro burst," said Jay Kimberly, a meteorology student who lives in the Port Richmond section of the city. "It blew metal and glass tables over six-foot fences. It came straight down and blew everything out of the way. Very scary indeed."

At the height of the storm more than 250,000 customers were left without power with the highest outages occurring in Chester County. But crews were able to cut that number by more than 100,000 by early Wednesday morning.

In Radnor, Pa., dozens of trees fell, taking down power lines and crashing into fences outside homes. In Yeadon, a large pine tree snapped along Lansdowne Avenue and crashed into a car that was waiting at a stop light.

"It just felt like something hit it," said the driver, Chris Lewis of Drexel Hill. "I saw the mirror fall so I knew something hit it, but I didn't know it was like that."

Lewis was not injured during the crash, though if the tree had landed only a few more inches in his direction, he very well could have been.

"Luckily nobody was in the backseat," Lewis said. "Thank God."

The storm forced SEPTA to suspend all service or operate partial service on three regional rail lines -- the Fox Chase, Chestnut Hill East and Paoli/Thorndale. Service was restored to all but the Chestnut Hill East line by Wednesday.

Here's a complete breakdown of the latest power numbers:

PENNSYLVANIA

PECO Energy

Chester County - 5,039

Caln Twp. - 138

Charlestown Twp. - 179

Coatesville City - 112

East Bradford Twp. - 159

East Fallowfield Twp. - 713

Schylkill Twp. - 106

Tredyffrin Twp. - 147

Uwchlan Twp. - 335

West Caln Twp. - 903

West Goshen Twp. - 130

West Pikeland Twp. - 134

Westtown Twp. - 352

Willistown Twp. - 219

Delaware County - 1306

Brookhaven Boro - 145

Chester City - 170

Haverford Twp. - 124

Newtown Twp. - 147

Radnor Twp. - 285

Montgomery County - 2183

Abington - 710

Cheltenham Twp. - 120

Lower Merion Twp. - 238

Lower Moreland Twp. - 120

Perkiomen Twp. - 279

Springfield Twp. - 204

Upper Moreland Twp. - 107

Philadelphia County - 467

Bucks County - 2,747

Bensalem Twp. - 105

Bristol Twp. - 579

Falls Twp. - 645

Lower Makefield Twp. 211

Lower Southampton Twp. - 104

Middletown Twp. - 376

Upper Southampton Twp. - 156

Warwick Twp. - 190
 

PPL

Lancaster County - 554

 

DELAWARE

Delmarva Power

New Castle County - 237

Caroline - 174

 

NEW JERSEY

PSE&G

Burlington County - 109

Camden County - 350


Atlantic City Electric

Burlington County - 1105

Power Company Contact Info

DO NOT call 911 to tell emergency operators that your power is out. They will be dealing with real medical emergencies. You can use the following numbers to report your loss of power.

PECO

    Emergency: 1-800-841-4141 (24 hour service)
    Customer Service: 1-800-494-4000 (Mon through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sat. 9 p.m. to 1 p.m.)

PPL

    Emergency: 1-800-DIAL-PPL (1-800-342-5775 (24 hour service)
    Customer Service: 1-800-DIAL-PPL (1-800-342-5775) (Mon. through Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

Atlantic City Electric

    Emergency: 1-800-833-7476
    Customer Service: 1-800-642-3780

PSEG

    Emergency: 800-436-PSEG (7734) (24 hour service)

Delmarva

    Emergency: New Castle County (DE) and Cecil and Harford Counties (MD) 1-800-898-8042
    Kent and Sussex Counties (DE) and the Eastern Shore of Maryland 1-800-898-8045

American Red Cross Southeastern Pennsylvania

    Contact: 215-299-4000



Photo Credit: Jeff Wagner]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Cleanup Continues in Delco]]> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 13:02:23 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007537505_1200x675_300411971679.jpg NBC10's Jesse Gary talks to a Radnor Township resident whose home was damaged by a massive tree during Tuesday night's storm.]]> <![CDATA[Thousands Left Without Power After Storms]]> Fri, 04 Jul 2014 17:59:14 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007502872_1200x675_296689731993.jpg Peco is working around the clock to restore power for residents all over the area.]]> <![CDATA[Strong Storms Knock Out Power]]> Fri, 04 Jul 2014 18:00:00 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/430AT_SOTVO_ISLA_VISTA__KNSD4271_1200x675_267298371513.jpg

Severe storms Thursday night knocked out power across the region and PECO officials tell NBC10 some may remain in the dark until Sunday.

Initially PECO reported 138,000 customers were without power in Philadelphia and Chester, Bucks, Delaware and Montgomery counties Thursday.

Crews restored power to nearly all those without service, but more than 13,000 are still waiting for the lights to turn back on a day later.

By 5p.m. Friday, PECO reported 6,007 customers without power in Chester County; 2,959 in Bucks County; 1,973 in Montgomery County; 1,915 in Delaware County; and 573 in Philadelphia.



Photo Credit: NBC 7]]>
<![CDATA[Storms Down Trees, Kill Power for Thousands]]> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 23:32:42 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007495684_1200x675_296191043524.jpg A line of powerful thunderstorms swept through the Delaware Valley Thursday evening, bringing trees down and knocking out power for thousands of people. NBC10's George Spencer took a ride through several counties, and reports on the damage he found.]]> <![CDATA[Arthur's Impact at Jersey Shore]]> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 23:32:35 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007495696_1200x675_296191555853.jpg Warning signs are posted at beaches along the shore about rough waters.]]> <![CDATA[Warning from the U.S. Coast Guard]]> Fri, 04 Jul 2014 04:23:48 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007494457_1200x675_296114755822.jpg The US Coast Guard is asking all recreational boats to stay off the water this weekend as the area anticipates rough waters due to Hurricane Arthur.]]> <![CDATA[Down the Shore: Calm Before Arthur]]> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 19:25:50 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007494524_1200x675_296118851655.jpg There have already been strong rip currents at some of the Jersey beaches but the weather is still nice in Ocean City. NBC10 is tracking Hurricane Arthur as the storm comes in and Cydney Long talked to families about how they might have to change their beach plans accordingly.]]> <![CDATA[Dramatic Photos: Hurricane Arthur Hits East Coast]]> Sat, 05 Jul 2014 01:46:18 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/214*120/AP765512733785.jpg Hurricane Arthur is expected to put a severe damper on the much anticipated July 4th weekend celebrations up and down the east coast. See photos of the preparation and aftermath.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Arthur Upgraded to Hurricane; Flooding Expected ]]> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 13:11:33 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/AP401973959969.jpg

The National Weather Service upgraded Tropical Storm Arthur to a hurricane early Thursday morning and continued to reiterate its warnings that flash floods could hit the region.

A flash flood watch began for most of the area Thursday morning and will continue into Friday afternoon as Tropical Storm Arthur moves up the east coast.

The cold front, which moved into the region on Wednesday, will become nearly stationary over our area on Thursday, leading to severe weather and potential flooding.

As tropical moisture from Arthur moves north along the cold front, showers and thunderstorms are expected to produce heavy rain Thursday afternoon into early Friday morning. Arthur will make its closest approach to the South Jersey and Delaware coast on Friday though it’s expected to be about 200 to 250 miles offshore.

According to the National Weather Service, thunderstorms Thursday into Friday will likely be slow moving with heavy rainfall. While river flooding is not expected, small stream and urban flooding is possible.

Wind gusts will be another issue during the storm with speeds expected at 35 mph or greater in the Philadelphia area. As for when the rain tapers off, the farther inland you are, the earlier the rain should clear. The Philly area should be dry by the afternoon while the rest of the area should by dry by Friday night, just in time for fireworks.

While Arthur will move out giving way to sunnier skies, its effects will remain as rip currents as well as high surf and seas will be a major threat on Friday into the weekend. Saturday and Sunday will be sunny and beautiful with highs in the mid-80's.

Stay with NBC10.com as we continue to track the severe weather.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Rip Current Danger]]> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 17:35:28 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007478429_1200x675_295062083872.jpg Mike Seidel explains the dangers that the upcoming storms may present at the shore. ]]> <![CDATA[Heat Advisory: Will Feel Like 100 Degrees Today]]> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 06:57:30 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Made-in-America-Water-Man-Cool.jpg

It will feel like 100 degrees today as a combination of high temperatures and increasing humidity deliver an oppressive punch to anyone working or playing outside.

The mercury is expected to climb to 96 degrees as humidity levels hit 62 percent, prompting a Heat Advisory to be issued for parts of the region from noon to 8 p.m.

The National Weather Service issued the advisory for Philadelphia, Delaware, Chester, Montgomery and Bucks counties as well as parts of South Jersey.

Elderly people, those with chronic medical conditions, people taking medications, those with a mental illness, pregnant women, small children and those who work in a high heat environment are the most at risk in extreme heat.

Here are some tips on dealing with the heat:

  • Avoid playing or working in the sun and other hot areas as much as possible
  • If you have to work in the sun, wear a head covering
  • Use air conditioners and fans
  • Open windows to release trapped hot air
  • If you’re taking regular medication, consult with your physician as some medications cause an adverse reaction in hot weather
  • Wear lightweight clothing
  • Drink plenty of non-alcoholic liquids to avoid dehydration
  • Maintain a normal diet
  • Shower or bathe in water that is near skin temperature
  • Don’t leave older people, children or pets alone in cars

Early signs of heat stress include decreased energy, a slight loss of appetite and nausea. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, go to a cool environment, drink fluids, remove excessive clothing and rest.

Serious signs of heat stress include unconsciousness, rapid heartbeat, throbbing headache, dry skin, chest pain, confusion, irritability, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle cramps, staggering and difficulty breathing.

If you experience any of these symptoms, make sure you get medical attention immediately. Also be sure to move to a cool area, remove excess clothing and have someone spray you with water while waiting.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Large Branch Lands on Cars in Rittenhouse]]> Thu, 26 Jun 2014 07:36:02 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/tree+blocks+delancy+street.JPG

A large tree branch came crashing down onto cars parked along a Rittenhouse Square street after strong storms moved through overnight.

The branch fell from a tree standing along the 2300 block of Delancy Street sometime early on Thrusday. It came to rest on at least two cars on the north side of the street and hit others on the south side.

The street remains blocked.

There are no reports of any injuries.



Photo Credit: NBC10.com]]>
<![CDATA[Heavy Rain, Storms Strike Region]]> Thu, 26 Jun 2014 00:21:51 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Lehigh-Valley-Storm-Photo.jpg

An urban and small stream flood advisory is in effect for parts of the area as a storm system continues to move through the region.

The National Weather Service issued the advisory for Eastern Berks County, Northwestern Berks County, Lehigh County, Northwestern Montgomery County, Northampton County and North Central Chester County until 12:30 a.m.

A line of showers and thunderstorms moved into those areas around 8:30 p.m., producing rainfall that dropped at one to one and a half inches per hour.

The system moved into the Philadelphia region late Wednesday night, bringing heavy rain and lightning.

A flood advisory was also in effect for Berks County, Northwestern Lehigh County, Monroe County, Carbon County and Northwestern Northampton County until 10:45 p.m.

A line of severe thunderstorms moved into those counties shortly after 8 p.m.

The storms produced rain that fell at one and a half inches per hour. The heavy rain led to rising creeks and streams as well as excessive runoff.

The system hit the State College area earlier on Wednesday dropping nearly an inch of rain in only 10 minutes, according to NBC10 First Alert Meteorologist Brittney Shipp.

The National Weather Service issued a flood advisory for East Central Blair County, Northern Huntingdon County and South Central Centre County that remained in effect until 5:30 p.m.

Residents who live near the Penn State campus took several photos of the flood waters.

The system is expected to move out of the area 2 a.m.



Photo Credit: Josh Bingham]]>
<![CDATA[Caught on Cam: Lightning Strikes in Delaware]]> Thu, 19 Jun 2014 06:25:46 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Claymont+Lightning+Bright+Shot.jpg NBC10 Facebook follower, Chris Low caught lightning striking in Claymont, Delaware overnight on Thursday. MORE COVERAGE:Lightning Explodes Chimney, May Have Sparked Series of Fires

Photo Credit: Chris Low]]>
<![CDATA[Lightning Explodes Chimney, May Have Sparked Series of Fires]]> Thu, 19 Jun 2014 09:16:40 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Doylestown+Chimney+Lightning+Explosion.jpg

Lighting struck two homes and may have sparked a series of fires in several houses across a number of Pennsylvania and New Jersey counties overnight -- keeping fire crews busy after a bout of severe weather.

A strong line of storms moved through the region during the early morning hours on Thursday dumping heavy rain, blowing strong winds and producing a bevy of lightning.

A lightning bolt connected with the chimney of a home at Wisteria Lane and Fox Glove Court in Doylestown, Bucks County around 3 a.m., county emergency dispatchers said. The strike caused the brick chimney to explode. Bricks and mortar were left strewn across the home's roof, front yard and were even thrown into the street. No one was hurt.


PHOTO: A composite photo showing the damage to a chimney at a home along Wisteria Lane in Doylestown, Pa. after it was struck by lightning overnight Thursday.

Further west, residents of a two-story home along the 200 block of Summer Ridge Circle in Chalfont, Bucks County told fire crews they heard a loud boom and then smelled smoke. When firefighters arrived, smoke and flames spreading through the attic of the home forcing them to cut holes in the roof. Everyone made it out of the home safely, officials said.

About 15 miles northwest in Trumbauersville, Bucks County, a garage along the 1700 block of Allentown Road caught fire around 2:15 a.m. Thursday, the town’s fire chief said. Trumbauersville Fire Chief Josh Mallery tells NBC10.com that the fire marshal will be investigating whether lighting sparked the small fire. Winds also uprooted two large trees and sent them crashing down into the garage. Part of the roof was broken off.

Mallery said a number of downed trees and live wires across the small town made it difficult for volunteer firefighters to quickly respond to fire calls. Quarter-size hail also fell during the strong storm.

In Chester County, an abandoned home along the unit block of Martin Road in Highland Township, Pa. caught fire around 3:30 a.m., officials with the Keystone Valley Fire Department told NBC10.com. The house was fully consumed by flames when fire crews arrived and it took two companies more than an hour to get the fire under control, officials said. Lightning is also being investigated as a cause for the fire.


PHOTO: Fire crews in Highland Township, Chester County are investigating whether lighting caused a fire that destroyed this home.

Over in Gloucester County, N.J., the attic of a home along Lynn Drive in West Deptford caught fire during the storm. Fire officials say the fire was brought under control within 30 minutes.

Lightning is also suspected as the cause of a house fire along Hickory Lane in Harrison Township just after 4:30 a.m.

Twenty-five miles south in Vineland, Cumberland County, officials say a lightning bolt caused smokey conditions in the basement of a home along the 600 block of Birch Street.

The NBC10 First Alert Weather Team says there will be a chance for more severe weather during the day Thursday, but that it most likely would not be as developed as the early morning system.



Photo Credit: NBC10.com]]>
<![CDATA[Find Relief From the Heat]]> Wed, 18 Jun 2014 10:46:34 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/heat+sun_722_406.jpg With serious heat hitting our area, it is important to know how to protect yourself and keep cool. NBC10's Katy Zachry reports with the latest information outside a cooling center in Collingswood, N.J.]]> <![CDATA[Dangerous Heat & Humidity Prompts Advisory]]> Wed, 18 Jun 2014 06:57:55 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/heat-advisory.jpg

A combination of high temperatures and humidity on Wednesday has prompted a Heat Advisory for a large part of the region.

Temperatures are expected to rise into the 90s with highs reaching towards the century mark at the height of the day, according to the NBC10 First Alert Weather Team.

"The humidity will be on the rise, the temperatures will be going up, it's going to be an uncomfortable day for sure," NBC10 First Alert Weather Meteorologist Tedd Florendo said.

Temperatures were already hovering around 80 degrees by 5 a.m. offering a preview for the day ahead.

The heat and humidity combination has prompted the National Weather Service to issue a Heat Advisory from noon until 7 p.m. on Wednesday for Philadelphia, Delaware, Camden, Gloucester, Mercer and New Castle counties. Parts of Bucks, Montgomery, Chester and Burlington counties are also included.

Officials are warning people prone to heat related illnesses to stay indoors and limit strenuous activities. Those who are working and playing outside are reminded to save the most vigorous activities for the early and late part of the day.

Camden County in New Jersey is opening cooling centers to offer a respite for those who do not have air conditioning. Officials say residents should contact their individual municipality to find the nearest location to them.

Philadelphia health officials tell NBC10.com the city only opens cooling centers when a Heat Warning is issued.

The high heat could also cause thunderstorms to form late in the day on Wednesday.

Be sure to check the NBC10 First Alert Weather App throughout the day for the latest on conditions.

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<![CDATA[Heat Advisory in Effect for Philly on Wednesday ]]> Tue, 17 Jun 2014 20:26:38 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Made-in-America-Water-Man-Cool.jpg

With temperatures in the mid-90’s and high humidity expected, a heat advisory has been issued for the Philadelphia area from noon to 7 p.m. on Wednesday.

Officials with the National Weather Service say the combined high temperatures and humidity will create a situation where heat illnesses are possible.

Elderly people, those with chronic medical conditions, people taking medications, those with a mental illness, pregnant women, small children and those who work in a high heat environment are the most at risk in extreme heat.

Here are some tips on dealing with the heat:

  • Avoid playing or working in the sun and other hot areas as much as possible
  • If you have to work in the sun, wear a head covering
  • Use air conditioners and fans
  • Open windows to release trapped hot air
  • If you’re taking regular medication, consult with your physician as some medications cause an adverse reaction in hot weather
  • Wear lightweight clothing
  • Drink plenty of non-alcoholic liquids to avoid dehydration
  • Maintain a normal diet
  • Shower or bathe in water that is near skin temperature
  • Don’t leave older people, children or pets alone in cars

Early signs of heat stress include decreased energy, a slight loss of appetite and nausea. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, go to a cool environment, drink fluids, remove excessive clothing and rest.

Serious signs of heat stress include unconsciousness, rapid heartbeat, throbbing headache, dry skin, chest pain, confusion, irritability, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle cramps, staggering and difficulty breathing.

If you experience any of these symptoms, make sure you get medical attention immediately. Also be sure to move to a cool area, remove excess clothing and have someone spray you with water while waiting.
 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Heat Safety Tips]]> Tue, 17 Jun 2014 15:25:48 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/HeatwaveSummer-edit.jpg As with any extended period of dangerous heat it is important to keep these safety tips in mind.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Heavy Rain, Flooding Strikes Area ]]> Wed, 11 Jun 2014 00:11:22 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/I-95-South-Flooding-Lead1.jpg

For the second day in a row, heavy rain and flooding slammed the region.

A flash flood warning was issued for East Central Delaware County, Southwestern Philadelphia County, Camden County and Northwestern Gloucester County and lasted until 8:15 p.m.

According to officials, heavy rain fell nearly 2 inches an hour in the affected areas.

In Philly, a heavy downpour led to low visibility and a slow commute for drivers. Citizens Bank Park could barely be seen from our camera. The I-95 northbound ramp to Broad Street was also closed around 6 p.m. due to flooding.

Excessive runoff from the rain caused flooding at small creeks and streams as well as highways, streets and underpasses.

A flash flood warning was also in effect until 5:30 p.m. in Northern New Castle County, Delaware. DelDOT officials reported flooding in portions of I-95 in the Wilmington area, especially near Churchmans Road.

Officials also measured 1.6 inches of rain in less than an hour at the Wilmington Airport.

The rain slowly moved out of the area late Tuesday, giving way to heavy fog.



Photo Credit: Adam Smith]]>
<![CDATA[Cars Stranded on Flooded Roads in Newark]]> Tue, 10 Jun 2014 05:11:25 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/newark-flooding.jpg

Cars were stranded in parts of Newark, N.J., Monday after heavy rains soaked the tri-state and flooded roads.

At least a foot of water flooded Meeker Street, near Weequahic Park under the NJ Transit tracks, and other areas saw higher amounts.

Some cars had trouble passing along the streets as the water rose.

More rain is on the way Monday night into Tuesday.



Photo Credit: thumper4405]]>
<![CDATA[Heavy Rain, Flooding Hits Philly, Montco ]]> Tue, 10 Jun 2014 00:11:59 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/Powerful-Rain-Generic-San-D.jpg

Heavy rain and flooding hit parts of the area on Monday, officially kicking off a wet week for the region.

A flash flood warning was issued for Southeastern Montgomery County and Northern Philadelphia County and remained in effect until 8:15 p.m.

The heavy rain caused flooding in small creeks, streams and roads throughout Philly and Montgomery County. Route 202 northbound in Upper Merion was closed due to the flooding but has since been reopened.

Stranded drivers were stuck in flood waters in Norristown and other parts of the area.

More rain will continue overnight into Tuesday and fog will move in, leading to low visibility during the morning rush.

While the rain will start to clear on Wednesday, the wet weather will return on Thursday and Friday. We won't start to see the sun again until the weekend.
 

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<![CDATA[Hail Storm Leaves Residents Paying for Repairs]]> Fri, 30 May 2014 12:24:40 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007186338_1200x675_269871171973.jpg Berks County is asking hail storm victims to file applications for state disaster aid that could make them eligible for low interest loans.
Click here for more information on how to apply for aid. ]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Damage Left Thousands Without Power]]> Wed, 28 May 2014 06:38:34 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007167613_1200x675_268355139781.jpg Across our area, thousands of residents lost power due to Tuesday's strong storms. NBC10's Jesse gary was there as crews worked to bring power back in Fox Chase.]]> <![CDATA[Jersey Shore Sidewalk Still Blocked by Sand From Hurricane]]> Wed, 28 May 2014 06:57:28 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/sandy-sand.JPG

A mound of sand 3 feet high in places that has covered at least a mile of Jersey Shore oceanfront sidewalk since Hurricane Sandy will finally be removed after state and local authorities have settled a dispute about who was responsible.

Pedestrians have not been able to walk along the sea wall in Monmouth Beach for more than a year and a half since the storm swept through and buried much of the area in sand.

The borough thought the state would take care of it because the sidewalk is along state road 36, but the state insisted sidewalks are the borough's responsibility.

The state long ago cleared the sand from the road.

Caryl Rossmer, who has lived across the road for 30 years, said the sand blasts windows of the oceanfront homes during storms.

"I have never seen this sand staying here, even in the other hurricanes," said Rossmer.

Mayor Sue Howard told NBC 4 New York on Tuesday that Monmouth Beach is now prepared to do the job, which will cost at least $10,000 and involves testing the sand for oil pollution from the roadway before it can be returned to the beach.

She is hoping it can be done by July 4.  

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<![CDATA[Severe Storms Knock Out Power, Topple Trees]]> Wed, 28 May 2014 00:29:28 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/downed+tree+bethlehem+pike+crop1.jpg

Thousands of people are in the dark after thunderstorms ripped through the area causing power outages and bringing down trees.

PECO reported the following power outages in the following counties as of midnight.:

Bucks County - 2454

Montgomery County - 2583

Chester County - 585

Philadelphia - 2805

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch and Severe Thunderstorm Warning were in effect for parts of the area on Tuesday. Both the watch and warning were cancelled around 9 p.m. and the thunderstorms moved offshore.

As predicted by NBC10 First Alert Weather Chief Meteorologist Glenn "Hurricane" Schwartz, the storm moved on top of the region by 6 p.m. and caused trees to fall in several parts of the area.

One tree fell on top of a truck on Roosevelt Boulevard in Northeast Philadelphia. Another tree fell across the road on Bethlehem Pike(pictured).

Residents on the 2900 block of Welsh Road in Philly were without power for most of the night. They told NBC10 the storm ripped down power lines and caused trees to shake.

"I heard my girlfriend's mother screaming fire," said Ian Saboe. "So I immediately ran up into the living room and big blue flashes came first from a transformer to the left and then another one to the right."

In Cheltenham, a telephone pole snapped. In Abington Township, crews worked for hours clearing trees off power lines and roads.

Photo Credit: Mandy

PECO officials are working throughout the night to restore power. 

While the storms are gone, a few overnight showers are possible as well as scattered showers on Wednesday.

Wednesday will also be much cooler with highs in the mid-70's. Those temperatures could drop to the 60's by the afternoon as winds shift to the Northeast.



Photo Credit: Mandy]]>
<![CDATA[Tornado Confirmed in Del.]]> Fri, 23 May 2014 16:44:36 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/WCAU_000000007137237_1200x675_264450115513.jpg Officials confirmed that a tornado touched down in Marydel, Kent County, Delaware. Now residents are left to pick up the pieces. NBC10's Tim Furlong talks to one victim whose home was destroyed and husband, lucky to be alive.]]> <![CDATA[Lightning Blamed for Fire That Destroyed NJ Farmhouse]]> Fri, 23 May 2014 10:50:39 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/UpperFreehold-fire.jpg
Firefighters say they believe lightning sparked a fire that seriously damaged an old farmhouse in New Jersey as a round of powerful thunderstorms battered the tri-state area early Thursday.

At least a dozen volunteer fire companies from four different counties responded to the blaze at the Upper Freehold farmhouse in Monmouth County, officials said. The farmhouse is off a dirt road and there are no hydrants nearby so firefighters had to use less expeditious methods to fight the blaze, which may have exacerbated the damage.

No one was home at the time of the fire and no injuries were reported. The house, though, was destroyed. White smoke billowed out from the charred shell of the home after firefighters doused the flames. 

Meteorologists say another powerful round of thunderstorms is expected to move across the area Thursday afternoon that could bring more intense lightning. 

Showers are expected off and on Friday and Saturday but the sun comes out in time for a beautiful rest of the Memorial Day weekend with temperatures in the high 70s Sunday and Monday. 


Photo Credit: NBC 4 New York]]>
<![CDATA[Hurricane Season Forecast? ]]> Fri, 23 May 2014 06:59:28 -0400 http://media.nbcphiladelphia.com/images/213*120/sat-add-P1.jpg

Forecasters are predicting a "near-normal or below-normal" hurricane season for the Atlantic this year, with the potential for up to 13 tropical storms.

Hurricane season begins June 1 and lasts six months. The NOAA said in its outlook released at a news conference in New York Thursday that scientists are predicting three to six of those storms could become hurricanes -- storms with winds of 74 mph or higher -- with one or two at a Category 3 or higher, with winds of at least 111 mph. 

The seasonal average for the Atlantic region, which includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, is 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, the NOAA said.

NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan said a key contributor to this year's outlook is the likely development of El Nino, which brings a stronger wind shear that reduces the intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes.

"Our scientists are seeing these climate features already starting to set up," Sullivan said.

NOAA's outlook says there is a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season and a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season.

NOAA officials stressed that it only takes one storm to devastate a community. Hurricane Sandy ravaged the East Coast in 2012, which was also predicted to be a near-normal season.

New York City Office of Emergency Management Commissioner Joe Bruno said the city was still prepping for the season, despite the positive outlook.

"I'm encouraged by the forecast but I'm not satisfied that we can be sure that's what's going to happen," he said.

Also Thursday, NOAA unveiled new tools, including storm surge maps that will help coastal residents know how high floods could be, where they could go and when they will arrive.  New Yorkers can learn more at NYC.gov/knowyourzone. The Federal Emergency Management Agency also has information on disaster readiness at Ready.gov.

 



Photo Credit: AP]]>