How to Get Rid of Stink Bugs

'Tis the season! Two pest control companies divulge their tips

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Stink bugs are appearing all over the Philadelphia region in record numbers.

    Effective stink bug control begins with some do-it-yourself prevention, says Ehrlich Pest Control’s Kristin Golden Mancuso. As a home owner you can do a number of things to prevent stink bugs, such as:

    • seal holes in exterior walls larger than the diameter of a pencil
    • check door and window frames for holes
    • ensure that door sweeps, doors and windows are tight-fitting and
    • be sure your window screens fit tightly

    Both live and dead stink bugs can be removed with a vacuum cleaner, however the vacuum may smell like stink bugs for a period of time. Some people prefer to sweep the stink bugs up using a broom and dust pan and will then discard them in an outdoor trash receptacle.

    If stink bugs have already entered your home, we recommend first trying to locate where they are gaining access, and then seal those openings with caulk or other suitable material.

    Royal Pest Management also says that prevention is most important and give detailed tips to make sure the smelly bugs don’t get in:

    • Stink bugs are looking for a place to "overwinter" (hibernate). They are attracted to the brightest, most reflective side of the home (usually the south side) and then look for a way in for a cold/dark place to shut down and survive the winter.  Seal all cracks and crevices on the sunny side of your home, especially.
    • Stink bugs feed in trees in the summer and like leafy plants and fruits...like tomato plants.  Cut back the leafy plants so they don’t touch your house. Keep them at least a foot to 18 inches from the house. If you have a vegetable garden near your home (less than 20 feet), especially tomatoes, pull them out.

    There is little a homeowner or any pest management company can do once they are in your home other than spray areas and kill them where they are hibernating, according to Rick DeDonato of Royal Pest Management.