Apple CEO Tears Up Over 'Unconscionable' Shooting | NBC 10 Philadelphia

Apple CEO Tears Up Over 'Unconscionable' Shooting

Tim Cook wiped a tear from his eye as his audience hushed for a moment of silence

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    Apple CEO Tim Cook leads the audience at the Worldwide Developer's Conference in a moment of silence in tribute to the victims of the Orlando nightclub massacre at an Apple event on June 13, 2016, in San Francisco.

    Apple CEO Tim Cook addressed the massacre in Orlando and asked for a moment of silence Monday at the tech giant's annual developer's conference.

    Cook spoke to the crowd Monday at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco during the weeklong Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, where the company touted its new line of smart watches and TV features. 

    Cook wrote at length about being gay in a 2014 op-ed, and on Monday celebrated the multiculturalism of Apple’s own Cupertino-based workforce.

    "At Apple, we celebrate our diversity. We know that it makes us stronger and moves everyone forward," Cook told the audience, saying the massacre of at least 49 people at a gay nightclub Sunday was a "senseless, unconscionable act of terrorism and hate, aimed at dividing and destroying."

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    He called for silence, and as the audience hushed for a moment in the dark theater, Cook wiped a tear from his eye.

    Having diversity in the world, Cook said Monday, “makes us stronger and moves everyone forward.”

    Since Cook came out to the public, he's supported several LGBT causes, including last year when he lent his name to an anti-discrimination bill in his native state of Alabama

    Last spring, under Cook's leadership, Apple announced it was giving $50 million to nonprofits to recruit a more diverse tech workforce. Most recently, in March, Cook and other tech leaders signed letters of disapproval to the North Carolina's governor over a state law derided by the Department of Justice for limiting legal protections to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

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