The Most Famous F-Bomb in Philadelphia

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    Corruptor of Philadelphia youths? Sparkpulg for FCC action.

    It has been about a month and a half since Phillies' second basemen Chase Utley uttered (OK, loudly pronounced not once but twice) the F-bomb at the World Series Championship parade at Citizens Bank Park, but the issue has not gone away.

    On Monday, Utley spoke about his foul language when he addressed the media about his surgically repaired hip.

    He said, “I tell all kids not to use that word. If they're 29 and they win the World Series, I think they can say that. But I definitely would say to all the kids out there, 'Kids, it's a bad word. Don't say it. And I'm dead serious.'” 

    Parents React to Utley F-Bomb FCC Investigation

    [PHI] Parents React to Utley F-Bomb FCC Investigation
    Phillies fans give their reaction to the FCC's investigation into the broadcasting of an expletive during the Phillies World Series Celebration.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has received 26 complaints from people regarding Utley’s language at the parade. 

    The stations that broadcast the parade were CBS3, 6ABC, NBC10, Fox29, and Comcast SportsNet. It was also broadcast on KYW1060 radio. 

    Although the FCC has received complaints, there is no word on whether or not the stations will face any sanctions. A spokeswoman from the FCC stated the agency does not comment on open issues. 

    The complaints were outlined in the Philadelphia Inquirer, but the names of the people making the complaints were retracted. 

    Here is an idea of a few of the complaints people gave the FCC:

    “If they didn't want such words to be broadcast, they should have aired [it] on a delay to catch any obscene language," wrote a viewer from Philadelphia. "Pull their license to broadcast.” 

    Another person gave a different angle. “He should be disciplined for his lack of respect towards his fans and in particular the children exposed to such vulgarity. . . . The broadcasters are not at fault. Chase Utley is.” 
     
    The biggest argument the stations will have trouble defending is the fact they did not set up any type of delays to protect themselves from something like this. Most of the anchors from the stations did issue an apology on the matter and say they have received few if any complaints from viewers. 

    A question to consider here:  Is Chase Utley that far out of line for the comment he made at the World Series?

    Chase has received criticism from the media for not showing much personality in public. He is known as being low key and laid back and a player who gives 100% effort on the field every game. Chase seemed to be just having a good time with his teammates and the fans trying to create a little extra humor to the day. 

    The 40,000 plus fans at the ballpark reacted positively after Utley’s statement and cheered loudly. 

    This may not make what Utley said right, but it does raise questions about whether this issue is being taken too far.