The History of Taney Baseball

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC10's Lu Ann Cahn is live in Taney Country where she is measuring the pulse of the community and the excitement for tomorrow's game. (Published Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014)

    Twenty years ago, the league behind the Taney Dragons started with three parents, a coach and a permit to play on a Philadelphia field.

    Now, the youth baseball team is the subject of national media frenzy thanks to its remarkable Little League World Series run and star pitcher Mo'ne Davis' 70 mph fastball.

    “The kind of attention we’ve had has absolutely been mind-boggling," co-founder Ellen Siegel said.

    Siegel is one of the five original founders of the Taney Youth Baseball Organization, which was formed back in 1994 by a group of locals who wanted to create a different kind of team for the city's children.

    Taney Dragons Prepare for World Series Matchup

    [PHI] Taney Dragons Prepare for World Series Matchup
    With an entire city behind them, the Taney Dragons prepare for their Little League World Series matchup on Wednesday. NBC10's Keith Jones has a preview. (Published Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014)

    “We wanted to be inclusive and allow girls to play,” Siegel said. “We also wanted players who weren’t as skilled to be allowed to play with the very skilled players. We wanted to be instructional which was our biggest point. Game, scores and winning weren’t as important as teaching all the kids proper mechanics, good sportsmanship, teamwork, camaraderie and knowing the game.”

    The decision to create a co-ed squad paved the way for the team's roster to incude 13-year-old Davis, whose series shutout and spunk have landed her national headlines and a spot on the cover of Sports Illustrated. She's set to pitch again tonight, when the team goes up against Las Vegas.

    Siegel, a clinical psychologist who serves on the league’s board of directors and helps administer the league’s registrar, website and Facebook page, still remembers the league’s humble beginnings at the Markward Recreation Center on 400 South Taney Street in Philly.

    “We practiced there and we’d have scrimmage games there and it was so wonderful to have something in our neighborhood with our kids,” Siegel said. “Then we thought it would be wonderful if we started a league of our own.”

    Little League World Series Anticipation

    [PHI] Little League World Series Anticipation
    Keith Jones is live in Williamsport, PA and talking to fans as they get ready for the Taney Dragons' debut tomorrow night against Las Vegas. A parent shares what it's like to make it there. (Published Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014)

    While the Markward Rec Center served as the home field, neighborhood parents and kids had a different name for it that ended up sticking.

    “All the neighbors called it Taney Field because it’s on Taney Street,” Siegel said. “I don’t think anyone really knows the real name. If you ask anyone where Markward is they’ll say, ‘what?’ If you ask them where Taney is they all know. That’s where we got our name.”

    The league remained a local attraction for nearly two decades until last year, when they officially joined the Little League.

    “We’ve always had the same kind of rule as Little League which is you need to play on your intramural team during the season,” Siegel said. “Then after that there are tryouts for the select tournament teams. The select, more competitive team will play after our regular season is over.”

    With the tremendous success of the Dragons and the national attention they’ve gained, Siegel says the league's popularity may become a problem.

    “We’re already getting so many requests to join us next year and we don’t have open registration until January,” Siegel said. “We’re worried about the influx of how many people would want to play because we can’t accommodate. We already had 73 teams this year from ages 3 to 16. We don’t have places for them.”

    Siegel hopes the league will receive offers for more fields for the teams to play on.

    “We’re in a situation where we don’t own our own fields, like a suburban league,” Siegel said. “We use Philadelphia Parks and Recreation fields.”

    Regardless of what happens with the increased interest or with Thursday’s game, Siegel is confident the spirit of the league, defined by unity rather than winning, will remain high for years to come.

    “We care about each other,” Siegel said. “Taney families, even on regular teams bond together and help each other out. To me that’s the essence of what we’re all about. The sense of community.”

    To donate to the league, visit the Taney Youth Baseball Association website.