Sanders Fans Plan DNC 'Fart-In' Protest of Clinton Nomination | NBC 10 Philadelphia
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Sanders Fans Plan DNC 'Fart-In' Protest of Clinton Nomination

Protesters will be able to fill up on beans at a a shantytown dubbed "Clintonville" in Kensington, one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods

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    U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) speaks to supporters in Manhattan at an event where he went over his core political beliefs on June 23, 2016 in New York City. This year a number of Sanders supporters are organizing a "fart-in" for July 28 both inside the Wells Fargo Center and outside on the street, at the moment presumptive Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accepts the party's nomination.

    A number of Bernie Sanders supporters are organizing a "fart-in" for July 28 both inside Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Center and outside on the street at the moment presumptive Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accepts the party's nomination, NBC News reported. 

    After putting the word out about the fart-in through her national organization, the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign, organizer Cheri Honkala said she began receiving beans from all over the country.

    Honkala said organizers will erect a shantytown dubbed "Clintonville" in Kensington, one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods, where protesters can load up on beans before Clinton's nomination is announced next Thursday.

    Honkala said the organization also plans to protest for economic justice beginning at 3 p.m. at Philadelphia's City Hall next Monday, when the Democratic convention begins. Her group was also scheduled to take part in an "End Poverty Now!" demonstration in Cleveland on Monday, the first day of the Republican convention.

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