Poll: 48 Percent Say House GOP Health Care Bill Is a Bad Idea | NBC 10 Philadelphia
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump

The latest news on President Donald Trump's first year as president

Poll: 48 Percent Say House GOP Health Care Bill Is a Bad Idea

This past February, however, 43 percent of Americans called the Obama plan a good idea, while 41 percent said it was bad

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Poll: 48 Percent Say House GOP Health Care Bill Is a Bad Idea
    Getty Images
    President Donald Trump speaks while flanked by House Republicans after they passed legislation aimed at repealing and replacing Obamacare, at the White House on May 4, 2017 in Washington, D.C.

    By a 2-to-1 ratio, Americans say the health care legislation that was recently passed by the House and supported by President Donald Trump is a bad idea instead of a good idea, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

    Forty-eight percent say it's a bad idea, including 43 percent of respondents who "strongly" believe that.

    By contrast, just 23 percent call the legislation a good idea, including 18 percent who "strongly" say that.

    This past February, however, 43 percent of Americans called the Obama plan a good idea, while 41 percent said it was bad.

    Senate Struggles With Health Care as Trump Signs VA Bill

    [NATL] Senate Struggles With Health Care Reform as Trump Signs VA Bill

    Just one day after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., released details of the Senate revised health care bill, five conservative senators expressed dissent with the current language of the bill. President Donald Trump, meanwhile, signed a law that makes it easier for the Department of Veteran Affairs to fire employees as part of a push for an agency overhaul. 

    (Published Friday, June 23, 2017)

    On May 4, the House approved legislation - by a narrow 217-213 majority - to repeal and replace Obama's Affordable Care Act. No Democrats voted for the bill, and the legislative activity has since moved to the U.S. Senate.