Venezuelan opposition responds to Goldman Sachs after bond investment - NBC 10 Philadelphia

Venezuelan opposition responds to Goldman Sachs after bond investment

According to Goldman Sachs, the investment firm purchased the bonds to help Venezuela

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    Venezuelan opposition responds to Goldman Sachs after bond investment
    AP
    Masked demonstrators walk carrying a golf club, center, and homemade shield as they join a march against the government of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela, May 31, 2017. Protests have left dozens dead in the last two months as the opposition demands immediate presidential elections and the liberation of political prisoners.

    The Wall Street Journal´s report on Goldman Sachs investment of over $800 million in bonds on Venezuelan oil-company PDVSA elicited strong opinions inside and outside the country.

    Members of Venezuelan opposition, including the president of the National Congress Julio Borges and ex-minister Ricardo Haussman, declared that the money invested in the falling economy of the country will be used on corrupt activities that will have a negative effect on Venezuelan civilians.

    According to CNBC, Goldman Sachs has defended its investment by stating that they purchased the bonds with the objective of improving Venezuela's economy in addition to earning a profit.

    Fernando Torres, president of the local organization Casa De Venezuela, declared that while the group is in the process of making an official declaration, their feelings are of “disturbance in witnessing how organizations of the size of Goldman Sachs support Maduro´s dictatorship and make immoral decisions that violate human rights.”

    “I believe that this money is going to be used on three things," Torres said, "buying people´s support; [padding the] international bank accounts of corrupted members of the government; and buying guns to attack the Venezuelan people who protest against this regime.”

    “We are trying to inform the American people of our problems and to find support from this community that defends and promotes human rights," Torres added. "I hope that Venezuelans will take this news and use it to find energy and motivation to keep fighting and resist the dictatorship. As Lopez said, ´El que se cansa, pierde´ — whoever gets tired, loses — and I don´t think Venezuelans are going to get tired anymore. I don´t believe they are going to accept Maduro´s alms anymore.”

    Members of the opposition in the beleaguered South American nation have been protesting for some 60 days — during which more than 60 deaths have been reported and thousands of civilians have been injured and detained. Meanwhile, Maduro has proposed creating a new National Assembly that would be elected by government officials from a candidate pool.

    Casa de Venezuela has held two medicine drives in the past months, and are planning to continue their support for the Venezuelan opposition in Venezuela.