Complete coverage of the child sex abuse scandal that rocked a college football giant

New Details About Sandusky's Alleged Victims

Court documents reveal new information about the case against former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Jerry Sandusky's trial is still set to begin in May.

    Prosecutors claim Jerry Sandusky sexually abused boys ranging in age from 8 to 17, eight of whom were molested on the Penn State campus, according to a document with new details about the case filed Thursday.

    The Pennsylvania attorney general's office said in the document that crimes involving one of the 10 alleged victims took place in Florida and Texas, while another boy was abused at his own school.

    Prosecutors were more specific in the document about the ages of the boys than in earlier reports, but much of the information is similar to details revealed in grand jury presentments issued last year that formed the basis for charges against the former Penn State assistant football coach.

    Sandusky, 68, is confined to his home while he awaits trial on 52 criminal counts. He denies the allegations, and his lawyer did not immediately reply to a message seeking comment Thursday.

    The latest court filing states that two of the boys, identified as Victim 2 and Victim 8, remain unidentified to authorities.

    The allegations involving Victim 2 are perhaps the most well known in the case. He was described by a grand jury report as a boy, about 10 years old, seen by a graduate assistant inside a football team shower with Sandusky in 2002. Prosecutors say the assistant, Mike McQueary, reported the incident to coach Joe Paterno and two university administrators, but police were never notified.

    The apparent failure of Penn State officials to contact police contributed to the ouster of Paterno, school president Graham Spanier and charges against two school officials.

    The document said that so-called Victim 4 endured offenses that took place in Florida in December 1998 and January 1999, when Penn State was playing in the Outback Bowl; and in Texas in December 1999, when Sandusky's final game occurred in the Alamo Bowl. The filing does not specify the offenses.

    The reference to other states comes less than a week after Penn State disclosed it received a subpoena from the U.S. Attorney's Office in Harrisburg, indicating a federal investigation is under way.

    A spokesman for the attorney general's office declined comment.

    In most of the allegations in the latest document, which was produced at the request of Sandusky's lawyer, prosecutors said they could not provide specific dates, noting some crimes occurred over many years, and the alleged victims were children at the time.

    Prosecutors said offenses happened from 1996 to 2009 and occurred at Sandusky's home, in State College hotels, at Penn State athletic facilities and inside a car.

    On Wednesday, Judge John Cleland turned down Sandusky's request for a two-month delay that would have given them more time to prepare for trial. Cleland has tentatively scheduled trial to begin with jury selection on May 14.

    Sandusky was arrested in early November, along with Penn State athletic director Tim Curley and vice president Gary Schultz. Curley, now on leave, and Schultz, who has retired, were accused of failing to properly report suspected child abuse and lying to a grand jury investigating Sandusky.

    Curley and Schultz have denied the allegations, and are waiting for a judge to rule on their requests to have charges dismissed.

    Neither Spanier nor Paterno were charged with any crime.

    Paterno died last month of lung cancer. Spanier remains a tenured faculty member.