Pa. Turnpike Worker Killed in Roadside Accident

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A Pennsylvania turnpike worker is killed in an accident.

    A Pennsylvania Turnpike worker died after being struck by a tractor-trailer early Sunday morning.

    The fatal accident occurred on the westbound side of the Pa. Turnpike in West Pikeland Township, Chester County shortly after 8 a.m. Sunday.

    William F. McGuigan, a 61-year-old resident of Ardsley, Pa. and Turnpike Commissioner equipment operator was part of a crew completing required maintenance in a closed lane between mileposts 314 and 316 early Sunday, when a tractor-trailer entered the lane, striking McGuigan and another Turnpike employee, maintenance foreman Steve Rudzik.

    McGuigan was killed. Rudzik sustained minor injuries, which were treated at Paoli Hospital before he was subsequently released. The driver of the commercial tractor trailer involved in the accident was taken to a local hospital for treatment.

    Gov. Tom Corbett and First Lady Susan Corbett expressed their condolences to McGuigan's family in a joint statement released Sunday.

    “We extend our heartfelt sympathies to the McGuigan family who has lost a husband and a father,” the statement read.

    “The workers who keep our transportation system running smoothly and safely are sometimes overlooked as they go about their jobs but their contributions are numerous as they risk their lives every day to keep our roads and bridges safe.”

    Turnpike Chairman William K. Lieberman also released a statement on behalf of turnpike employees who were "deeply saddened by the tragedy."

    Both Lieberman and Gov. Corbett said the incident emphasizes the importance of safe driving.

    "Such a tragedy underscores the importance of exercising extreme caution when driving through any highway maintenance or construction zone," Lieberman said.

    "It is important for motorists on every road in our commonwealth to remember that construction zones are workplaces," Corbett said. "The men and women who labor there count on drivers to honor the warning signs, to slow down, and to watch carefully as they pass through."