What Went Wrong in Death of Philadelphia Firefighter Joyce Craig? | NBC 10 Philadelphia

What Went Wrong in Death of Philadelphia Firefighter Joyce Craig?

Reports describe how firefighter died; oxygen hose burned

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Federal officials have released details about the death of Philadelphia Firefighter Joyce Craig who was killed in the line of duty more than two years ago. NBC10’s Pamela Osborne is in Northern Liberties with more on how the Philadelphia Fire Department plans to keep its firefighters safer.

    (Published Tuesday, April 18, 2017)

    Officials say a Philadelphia firefighter died more than two years ago because a hose supplying her with oxygen had burned through, and they found problems with how her colleagues responded to her seven emergency distress signals.

    The fire department and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health released reports Monday about the December 2014 death of 37-year-old Lt. Joyce Craig.

    New Report Attributes Death of Philly Female Firefighter to Flaws in Department

    [PHI] New Report Attributes Death of Philly Female Firefighter to Flaws in Department

    A new report shows that flaws within the Philadelphia Fire Department contributed to the death of the city’s first female firefighter killed in the line of duty. NBC10’s Pamela Osborne is in Northern Liberties with the details surrounding the death of Firefighter Joyce Craig.

    (Published Tuesday, April 18, 2017)

    Craig was killed while battling a wind-whipped house fire at 1655 Middleton Street. 

    The city's report says indirect causes of her death include lack of situational awareness, inadequate communications, poor strategy and tactics and an uncoordinated rescue effort.

    The federal study says a failure to quickly deploy an intervention team contributed to her death.

    Craig was the first female firefighter from the Department to die in the line of duty. 

    "Joyce Craig's death was devastating to her family and to the Department," Fire Commissioner Adam Thiel said. "We hope the lessons learned from these reports will prevent such tragedies in the future."

    The department says it's made changes as a result. The fire commissioner plans to speak about the incident on Tuesday.